What do patients value in the hospital meal experience?

Authors: Hartwell, H., Shepherd, P., Edwards, J.S.A. and Johns, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22574/

Journal: Appetite

A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Shepherd, P.A., Edwards, J.S.A. and Johns, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22574/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 96

Pages: 293-298

eISSN: 1095-8304

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.09.023

A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Shepherd, P.A., Edwards, J.S.A. and Johns, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22574/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 96

Pages: 293-298

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.09.023

© 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Shepherd, P.A., Edwards, J.S.A. and Johns, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22574/

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 96

Pages: 293-298

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.09.023

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Shepherd, P.A., Edwards, J.S. and Johns, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22574/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 96

Pages: 293-298

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.