Frequency Drives Lexical Access in Reading but Not in Speaking: The Frequency-Lag Hypothesis

Authors: Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., Van Assche, E., Duyck, W. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

Volume: 140

Issue: 2

Pages: 186-209

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/a0022256

Abstract:

To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word frequency (high, low), context (none, low constraint, high constraint), and level of English proficiency (monolingual, Spanish-English bilingual, Dutch-English bilingual) on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic constraint effects were larger in production than in reading. Frequency effects were larger in production than in reading without constraining context but larger in reading than in production with constraining context. Bilingual disadvantages were modulated by frequency in production but not in eye fixation times, were not smaller in low-constraint contexts, and were reduced by high-constraint contexts only in production and only at the lowest level of English proficiency. These results challenge existing accounts of bilingual disadvantages and reveal fundamentally different processes during lexical access across modalities, entailing a primarily semantically driven search in production but a frequency-driven search in comprehension. The apparently more interactive process in production than comprehension could simply reflect a greater number of frequency-sensitive processing stages in production. © 2011 American Psychological Association.

Source: Scopus

Frequency drives lexical access in reading but not in speaking: the frequency-lag hypothesis.

Authors: Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., Van Assche, E., Duyck, W. and Rayner, K.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Gen

Volume: 140

Issue: 2

Pages: 186-209

eISSN: 1939-2222

DOI: 10.1037/a0022256

Abstract:

To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word frequency (high, low), context (none, low constraint, high constraint), and level of English proficiency (monolingual, Spanish-English bilingual, Dutch-English bilingual) on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic constraint effects were larger in production than in reading. Frequency effects were larger in production than in reading without constraining context but larger in reading than in production with constraining context. Bilingual disadvantages were modulated by frequency in production but not in eye fixation times, were not smaller in low-constraint contexts, and were reduced by high-constraint contexts only in production and only at the lowest level of English proficiency. These results challenge existing accounts of bilingual disadvantages and reveal fundamentally different processes during lexical access across modalities, entailing a primarily semantically driven search in production but a frequency-driven search in comprehension. The apparently more interactive process in production than comprehension could simply reflect a greater number of frequency-sensitive processing stages in production.

Source: PubMed

Frequency Drives Lexical Access in Reading but Not in Speaking: The Frequency-Lag Hypothesis

Authors: Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., Van Assche, E., Duyck, W. and Rayner, K.

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-GENERAL

Volume: 140

Issue: 2

Pages: 186-209

eISSN: 1939-2222

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/a0022256

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Frequency drives lexical access in reading but not in speaking: the frequency-lag hypothesis.

Authors: Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., Van Assche, E., Duyck, W. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

Volume: 140

Pages: 186

Publisher: American Psychological Association

Source: Manual

Frequency drives lexical access in reading but not in speaking: the frequency-lag hypothesis.

Authors: Gollan, T.H., Slattery, T.J., Goldenberg, D., Van Assche, E., Duyck, W. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. General

Volume: 140

Issue: 2

Pages: 186-209

eISSN: 1939-2222

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/a0022256

Abstract:

To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word frequency (high, low), context (none, low constraint, high constraint), and level of English proficiency (monolingual, Spanish-English bilingual, Dutch-English bilingual) on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic constraint effects were larger in production than in reading. Frequency effects were larger in production than in reading without constraining context but larger in reading than in production with constraining context. Bilingual disadvantages were modulated by frequency in production but not in eye fixation times, were not smaller in low-constraint contexts, and were reduced by high-constraint contexts only in production and only at the lowest level of English proficiency. These results challenge existing accounts of bilingual disadvantages and reveal fundamentally different processes during lexical access across modalities, entailing a primarily semantically driven search in production but a frequency-driven search in comprehension. The apparently more interactive process in production than comprehension could simply reflect a greater number of frequency-sensitive processing stages in production.

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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