The effect of the frequencies of three consecutive content words on eye movements during reading

Authors: Slattery, T.J., Pollatsek, A. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Memory and Cognition

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 1283-1292

ISSN: 0090-502X

DOI: 10.3758/BF03193601

Abstract:

The frequencies of three consecutive content words were simultaneously varied in the first sentence of a two-sentence passage. Various eye movement measures of first-pass processing (first-fixation duration, gaze duration, and go-past time) all revealed frequency effects for all three words. The size of the effect did not differ significantly across the three words on either first-fixation duration or gaze duration, but it increased markedly for go-past time from the first to the second word, possibly indicating an accumulation of the difficulty of processing. In addition, there was a delayed effect of the frequency manipulation: For the sentences with three low-frequency words, processing at the beginning of the next (second) sentence was lengthened. (The beginning of the second sentence was always at least four words from the last of the frequency-manipulated words.) These findings indicate that word frequency has effects beyond initial lexical access in reading. A list of the experimental items and supplemental analyses may be downloaded from www.psychonomic.org/ archive. Copyright 2007 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

Source: Scopus

The effect of the frequencies of three consecutive content words on eye movements during reading.

Authors: Slattery, T.J., Pollatsek, A. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Mem Cognit

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 1283-1292

ISSN: 0090-502X

DOI: 10.3758/bf03193601

Abstract:

The frequencies of three consecutive content words were simultaneously varied in the first sentence of a two-sentence passage. Various eye movement measures of first-pass processing (first-fixation duration, gaze duration, and go-past time) all revealed frequency effects for all three words. The size of the effect did not differ significantly across the three words on either first-fixation duration or gaze duration, but it increased markedly for go-past time from the first to the second word, possibly indicating an accumulation of the difficulty of processing. In addition, there was a delayed effect of the frequency manipulation: For the sentences with three low-frequency words, processing at the beginning of the next (second) sentence was lengthened. (The beginning of the second sentence was always at least four words from the last of the frequency-manipulated words.) These findings indicate that word frequency has effects beyond initial lexical access in reading. A list of the experimental items and supplemental analyses may be downloaded from www.psychonomic.org/archive.

Source: PubMed

The effect of the frequencies of three consecutive content words on eye movements during reading

Authors: Slattery, T.J., Pollatsek, A. and Rayner, K.

Journal: MEMORY & COGNITION

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 1283-1292

eISSN: 1532-5946

ISSN: 0090-502X

DOI: 10.3758/BF03193601

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The effect of the frequencies of three consecutive content words on eye movements during reading

Authors: Slattery, T.J., Pollatsek, A. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Memory & cognition

Volume: 35

Pages: 1283-1292

Publisher: Springer

Source: Manual

The effect of the frequencies of three consecutive content words on eye movements during reading.

Authors: Slattery, T.J., Pollatsek, A. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Memory & cognition

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 1283-1292

eISSN: 1532-5946

ISSN: 0090-502X

DOI: 10.3758/bf03193601

Abstract:

The frequencies of three consecutive content words were simultaneously varied in the first sentence of a two-sentence passage. Various eye movement measures of first-pass processing (first-fixation duration, gaze duration, and go-past time) all revealed frequency effects for all three words. The size of the effect did not differ significantly across the three words on either first-fixation duration or gaze duration, but it increased markedly for go-past time from the first to the second word, possibly indicating an accumulation of the difficulty of processing. In addition, there was a delayed effect of the frequency manipulation: For the sentences with three low-frequency words, processing at the beginning of the next (second) sentence was lengthened. (The beginning of the second sentence was always at least four words from the last of the frequency-manipulated words.) These findings indicate that word frequency has effects beyond initial lexical access in reading. A list of the experimental items and supplemental analyses may be downloaded from www.psychonomic.org/archive.

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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