Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese

Authors: Yang, J., Li, N., Wang, S., Slattery, T.J. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Visual Cognition

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-213

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2014.890689

Abstract:

Previous studies have shown that a plausible preview word can facilitate the processing of a target word as compared to an implausible preview word (a plausibility preview benefit effect) when reading Chinese (Yang, Wang, Tong, & Rayner, 2012; Yang, 2013). Regarding the nature of this effect, it is possible that readers processed the meaning of the plausible preview word and did not actually encode the target word (given that the parafoveal preview word lies close to the fovea). The current experiment examined this possibility with three conditions wherein readers received a preview of a target word that was either (1) identical to the target word (identical preview), (2) a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, but the post-target text in the sentence was incompatible with it (initially plausible preview), or (3) not a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, nor compatible with the post-target text (implausible preview). Gaze durations on target words were longer in the initially plausible condition than the identical condition. Overall, the results showed a typical preview benefit, but also implied that readers did not encode the initially plausible preview. Also, a plausibility preview benefit was replicated: gaze durations were longer with implausible previews than the initially plausible ones. Furthermore, late eye movement measures did not reveal differences between the initially plausible and the implausible preview conditions, which argues against the possibility of misreading the plausible preview word as the target word. In sum, these results suggest that a plausible preview word provides benefit in processing the target word as compared to an implausible preview word, and this benefit is only present in early but not late eye movement measures. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

Source: Scopus

Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese.

Authors: Yang, J., Li, N., Wang, S., Slattery, T.J. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Vis cogn

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-213

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2014.890689

Abstract:

Previous studies have shown that a plausible preview word can facilitate the processing of a target word as compared to an implausible preview word (a plausibility preview benefit effect) when reading Chinese (Yang, Wang, Tong, & Rayner, 2012; Yang, 2013). Regarding the nature of this effect, it is possible that readers processed the meaning of the plausible preview word and did not actually encode the target word (given that the parafoveal preview word lies close to the fovea). The current experiment examined this possibility with three conditions wherein readers received a preview of a target word that was either (1) identical to the target word (identical preview), (2) a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, but the post-target text in the sentence was incompatible with it (initially plausible preview), or (3) not a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, nor compatible with the post-target text (implausible preview). Gaze durations on target words were longer in the initially plausible condition than the identical condition. Overall, the results showed a typical preview benefit, but also implied that readers did not encode the initially plausible preview. Also, a plausibility preview benefit was replicated: gaze durations were longer with implausible previews than the initially plausible ones. Furthermore, late eye movement measures did not reveal differences between the initially plausible and the implausible preview conditions, which argues against the possibility of misreading the plausible preview word as the target word. In sum, these results suggest that a plausible preview word provides benefit in processing the target word as compared to an implausible preview word, and this benefit is only present in early but not late eye movement measures.

Source: PubMed

Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese

Authors: Yang, J., Li, N., Wang, S., Slattery, T.J. and Rayner, K.

Journal: VISUAL COGNITION

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-213

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2014.890689

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese

Authors: Yang, J., Li, N., Wang, S., Slattery, T.J. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Visual cognition

Volume: 22

Pages: 193-213

Publisher: Routledge

Source: Manual

Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese.

Authors: Yang, J., Li, N., Wang, S., Slattery, T.J. and Rayner, K.

Journal: Visual cognition

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-213

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2014.890689

Abstract:

Previous studies have shown that a plausible preview word can facilitate the processing of a target word as compared to an implausible preview word (a plausibility preview benefit effect) when reading Chinese (Yang, Wang, Tong, & Rayner, 2012; Yang, 2013). Regarding the nature of this effect, it is possible that readers processed the meaning of the plausible preview word and did not actually encode the target word (given that the parafoveal preview word lies close to the fovea). The current experiment examined this possibility with three conditions wherein readers received a preview of a target word that was either (1) identical to the target word (identical preview), (2) a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, but the post-target text in the sentence was incompatible with it (initially plausible preview), or (3) not a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, nor compatible with the post-target text (implausible preview). Gaze durations on target words were longer in the initially plausible condition than the identical condition. Overall, the results showed a typical preview benefit, but also implied that readers did not encode the initially plausible preview. Also, a plausibility preview benefit was replicated: gaze durations were longer with implausible previews than the initially plausible ones. Furthermore, late eye movement measures did not reveal differences between the initially plausible and the implausible preview conditions, which argues against the possibility of misreading the plausible preview word as the target word. In sum, these results suggest that a plausible preview word provides benefit in processing the target word as compared to an implausible preview word, and this benefit is only present in early but not late eye movement measures.

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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