Effects of exposure to facial expression variation in face learning and recognition

This source preferred by Changhong Liu

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Chen, W. and Ward, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24072/

Journal: Psychol Res

Volume: 79

Issue: 6

Pages: 1042-1053

eISSN: 1430-2772

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-014-0627-8

Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Chen, W. and Ward, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24072/

Journal: Psychological Research

Volume: 79

Issue: 6

Pages: 1042-1053

eISSN: 1430-2772

ISSN: 0340-0727

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-014-0627-8

© 2014, The Author(s). Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Chen, W. and Ward, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24072/

Journal: Psychological Research

Publisher: Springer Verlag

eISSN: 1430-2772

ISSN: 0340-0727

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-014-0627-8

Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Liu, C.H., Chen, W. and Ward, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24072/

Journal: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PSYCHOLOGISCHE FORSCHUNG

Volume: 79

Issue: 6

Pages: 1042-1053

eISSN: 1430-2772

ISSN: 0340-0727

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-014-0627-8

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Chen, W. and Ward, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24072/

Journal: Psychological research

Volume: 79

Issue: 6

Pages: 1042-1053

eISSN: 1430-2772

ISSN: 0340-0727

Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

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