Solving the border control problem: Evidence of enhanced face matching in individuals with extraordinary face recognition skills

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Dowsett, A.J. and Bate, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23210/

Journal: PLoS One

Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)

ISSN: 1932-6203

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Dowsett, A.J. and Bate, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23210/

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: e0148148

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148148

Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Dowsett, A.J. and Bate, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23210/

Journal: PLoS ONE

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148148

© 2016 Bobak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Dowsett, A.J. and Bate, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23210/

Journal: PLOS ONE

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148148

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Dowsett, A.J. and Bate, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23210/

Journal: PloS one

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: e0148148

eISSN: 1932-6203

Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies.

The data on this page was last updated at 18:34 on October 27, 2020.