Children view own-age faces qualitatively differently to other-age faces

Authors: Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23400/

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20445911.2016.1164710

Journal: Journal of Cognitive Psychology

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2016.1164710

ike most own-group biases in face recognition, the own-age bias (OAB) is thought to be based either on perceptual expertise or socio-cognitive motivational mechanisms [Wolff, N., Kemter, K., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2013). What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. doi:10.1093/scan/nst024]. The present study employed a recognition paradigm with eye-tracking in order to assess whether participants actively viewed faces of their own-age differently to that of other-age faces. The results indicated a significant OAB (superior recognition for own-age relative to other-age faces), provided that they were upright, indicative of expertise being employed for the recognition of own-age faces. However, the eye-tracking results indicate that viewing other-age faces was qualitatively different to the viewing of own-age faces, with more nose fixations for other-age faces. These results are interpreted as supporting the socio-cognitive model of the OAB.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Willis, S.F.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23400/

Journal: J Cogn Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 28

Issue: 5

Pages: 601-610

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2016.1164710

Like most own-group biases in face recognition, the own-age bias (OAB) is thought to be based either on perceptual expertise or socio-cognitive motivational mechanisms [Wolff, N., Kemter, K., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2013). What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. doi:10.1093/scan/nst024]. The present study employed a recognition paradigm with eye-tracking in order to assess whether participants actively viewed faces of their own-age differently to that of other-age faces. The results indicated a significant OAB (superior recognition for own-age relative to other-age faces), provided that they were upright, indicative of expertise being employed for the recognition of own-age faces. However, the eye-tracking results indicate that viewing other-age faces was qualitatively different to the viewing of own-age faces, with more nose fixations for other-age faces. These results are interpreted as supporting the socio-cognitive model of the OAB.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Willis, S.F.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23400/

Journal: Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Volume: 28

Issue: 5

Pages: 601-610

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2016.1164710

© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Like most own-group biases in face recognition, the own-age bias (OAB) is thought to be based either on perceptual expertise or socio-cognitive motivational mechanisms [Wolff, N., Kemter, K., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2013). What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. doi:10.1093/scan/nst024]. The present study employed a recognition paradigm with eye-tracking in order to assess whether participants actively viewed faces of their own-age differently to that of other-age faces. The results indicated a significant OAB (superior recognition for own-age relative to other-age faces), provided that they were upright, indicative of expertise being employed for the recognition of own-age faces. However, the eye-tracking results indicate that viewing other-age faces was qualitatively different to the viewing of own-age faces, with more nose fixations for other-age faces. These results are interpreted as supporting the socio-cognitive model of the OAB.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Willis, S.F.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23400/

Journal: JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 28

Issue: 5

Pages: 601-610

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2016.1164710

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Willis, S.F.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23400/

Journal: Journal of cognitive psychology (Hove, England)

Volume: 28

Issue: 5

Pages: 601-610

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

Like most own-group biases in face recognition, the own-age bias (OAB) is thought to be based either on perceptual expertise or socio-cognitive motivational mechanisms [Wolff, N., Kemter, K., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2013). What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. doi:10.1093/scan/nst024]. The present study employed a recognition paradigm with eye-tracking in order to assess whether participants actively viewed faces of their own-age differently to that of other-age faces. The results indicated a significant OAB (superior recognition for own-age relative to other-age faces), provided that they were upright, indicative of expertise being employed for the recognition of own-age faces. However, the eye-tracking results indicate that viewing other-age faces was qualitatively different to the viewing of own-age faces, with more nose fixations for other-age faces. These results are interpreted as supporting the socio-cognitive model of the OAB.

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