Does aid create trade? An investigation for european donors and african recipients

Authors: Lloyd, R.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0033812547&partnerID=40&md5=24fae09238dc8f8e2740eb9f5209a772

Journal: European Journal of Development Research

Volume: 12

Pages: 107-123

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Authors: Lloyd, T., McGillivray, M., Morrissey, O. and Osei, R.

Journal: European Journal of Development Research

Volume: 12

Issue: 1

Pages: 107-123

eISSN: 1743-9728

ISSN: 0957-8811

DOI: 10.1080/09578810008426754

This article has a simple aim - to demonstrate that an empirical link between aid and trade may exist (for some donor-recipient pairs), but that the nature of this linkage is complex and can take a variety of forms. We challenge the commonly made assertion that aid creates trade. Theoretical considerations can be used to justify a link from aid to trade, from trade to aid, or in both directions together. Indeed, there may be no empirical linkage at all. We examine data on aid and trade flows for a sample of four European donors and 26 African recipients over 1969-95. Three broad findings emerge. First, a statistical link between aid and trade, of whatever form, is the exception rather than the norm. Second, there is very little evidence that aid creates trade; this argument for tied aid is unproven on our analysis of aggregate bilateral flows. Third, France, unlike the other donors examined, does appear more likely to use trade links as a criterion in determining aid allocations. © 2000 European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes.

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