The definition and diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Bate, S. and Tree, J.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24435/

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 70

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-200

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2016.1195414

Over the last 20 years much attention in the field of face recognition has been directed towards the study of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), with some authors investigating the behavioural characteristics of the condition, and many others using these individuals to further our theoretical understanding of the typical face-processing system. It is broadly agreed that the term "DP" refers to people who have failed to develop the ability to recognize faces in the absence of neurological illness or injury, yet more precise terminology in relation to potential subtypes of the population are yet to be confirmed. Furthermore, specific diagnostic techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria have yet to be uniformly accepted across the field, making cross-paper comparisons and meta-analyses very difficult. This paper presents an overview of the current challenges that face research into DP and introduces a series of papers that attempt to further our understanding of the condition's characteristics. It is hoped that this special issue will provide a springboard for further research addressing these issues, improving the current state of the art by ensuring the quality of theoretical investigations into DP, and by posing advances that will assist those who have the condition.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bate, S. and Tree, J.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24435/

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 70

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-200

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2016.1195414

© 2016 The Experimental Psychology Society. Over the last 20 years much attention in the field of face recognition has been directed towards the study of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), with some authors investigating the behavioural characteristics of the condition, and many others using these individuals to further our theoretical understanding of the typical face-processing system. It is broadly agreed that the term “DP” refers to people who have failed to develop the ability to recognize faces in the absence of neurological illness or injury, yet more precise terminology in relation to potential subtypes of the population are yet to be confirmed. Furthermore, specific diagnostic techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria have yet to be uniformly accepted across the field, making cross-paper comparisons and meta-analyses very difficult. This paper presents an overview of the current challenges that face research into DP and introduces a series of papers that attempt to further our understanding of the condition’s characteristics. It is hoped that this special issue will provide a springboard for further research addressing these issues, improving the current state of the art by ensuring the quality of theoretical investigations into DP, and by posing advances that will assist those who have the condition.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Bate, S. and Tree, J.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24435/

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 70

Issue: 2

Pages: 193-200

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2016.1195414

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Bate, S. and Tree, J.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24435/

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Pages: 1-22

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

Over the last 20 years much attention in the field of face recognition has been directed towards the study of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), with some authors investigating the behavioural characteristics of the condition and many others using these individuals to further our theoretical understanding of the typical face-processing system. It is broadly agreed that the term "DP" refers to people who have failed to develop the ability to recognize faces in the absence of neurological illness or injury, yet more precise terminology in relation to potential subtypes of the population are yet to be confirmed. Further, specific diagnostic techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria have yet to be uniformly accepted across the field, making cross-paper comparisons and meta-analyses very difficult. This paper presents an overview of the current challenges that face research into DP, and introduces a series of papers that attempt to further our understanding of the condition's characteristics. It is hoped that that this special issue will provide a springboard for further research addressing these issues, improving the current state of the art by ensuring the quality of theoretical investigations into DP, and by posing advances that will assist those who have the condition.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:24 on October 24, 2020.