Detecting superior face recognition skills in a large sample of young British adults

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Pampoulov, P. and Bate, S.

Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Volume: 7

Issue: SEP

eISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Abstract:

The Cambridge Face Memory Test Long Form (CFMT+) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) are typically used to assess the face processing ability of individuals who believe they have superior face recognition skills. Previous large-scale studies have presented norms for the CFPT but not the CFMT+. However, previous research has also highlighted the necessity for establishing country-specific norms for these tests, indicating that norming data is required for both tests using young British adults. The current study addressed this issue in 254 British participants. In addition to providing the first norm for performance on the CFMT+ in any large sample, we also report the first UK specific cut-off for superior face recognition on the CFPT. Further analyses identified a small advantage for females on both tests, and only small associations between objective face recognition skills and self-report measures. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship between trait or social anxiety and face processing ability, and no associations were noted. The implications of these findings for the classification of super-recognizers are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24790/

Source: Scopus

Detecting Superior Face Recognition Skills in a Large Sample of Young British Adults.

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Pampoulov, P. and Bate, S.

Journal: Front Psychol

Volume: 7

Pages: 1378

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Abstract:

The Cambridge Face Memory Test Long Form (CFMT+) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) are typically used to assess the face processing ability of individuals who believe they have superior face recognition skills. Previous large-scale studies have presented norms for the CFPT but not the CFMT+. However, previous research has also highlighted the necessity for establishing country-specific norms for these tests, indicating that norming data is required for both tests using young British adults. The current study addressed this issue in 254 British participants. In addition to providing the first norm for performance on the CFMT+ in any large sample, we also report the first UK specific cut-off for superior face recognition on the CFPT. Further analyses identified a small advantage for females on both tests, and only small associations between objective face recognition skills and self-report measures. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship between trait or social anxiety and face processing ability, and no associations were noted. The implications of these findings for the classification of super-recognizers are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24790/

Source: PubMed

Detecting Superior Face Recognition Skills in a Large Sample of Young British Adults

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Pampoulov, P. and Bate, S.

Journal: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 7

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24790/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Detecting Superior Face Recognition Skills in a Large Sample of Young British Adults

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Pampoulov, P. and Bate, S.

Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Publisher: Frontiers Media

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Abstract:

The Cambridge Face Memory Test Long Form (CFMT+) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) are typically used to assess the face processing ability of individuals who believe they have superior face recognition skills. Previous large-scale studies have presented norms for the CFPT but not the CFMT+. However, previous research has also highlighted the necessity for establishing country-specific norms for these tests, indicating that norming data is required for both tests using young British adults. The current study addressed this issue in 254 British participants. In addition to providing the first norm for performance on the CFMT+ in any large sample, we also report the first UK specific cut-off for superior face recognition on the CFPT. Further analyses identified a small advantage for females on both tests, and only small associations between objective face recognition skills and self-report measures. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship between trait or social anxiety and face processing ability, and no associations were noted. The implications of these findings for the classification of super-recognizers are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24790/

Source: Manual

Detecting Superior Face Recognition Skills in a Large Sample of Young British Adults.

Authors: Bobak, A.K., Pampoulov, P. and Bate, S.

Journal: Frontiers in psychology

Volume: 7

Pages: 1378

eISSN: 1664-1078

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Abstract:

The Cambridge Face Memory Test Long Form (CFMT+) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) are typically used to assess the face processing ability of individuals who believe they have superior face recognition skills. Previous large-scale studies have presented norms for the CFPT but not the CFMT+. However, previous research has also highlighted the necessity for establishing country-specific norms for these tests, indicating that norming data is required for both tests using young British adults. The current study addressed this issue in 254 British participants. In addition to providing the first norm for performance on the CFMT+ in any large sample, we also report the first UK specific cut-off for superior face recognition on the CFPT. Further analyses identified a small advantage for females on both tests, and only small associations between objective face recognition skills and self-report measures. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship between trait or social anxiety and face processing ability, and no associations were noted. The implications of these findings for the classification of super-recognizers are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24790/

Source: Europe PubMed Central