A comparison of event impacts: Zimbabwe and the UK

Authors: Sadd, D. and Musikavanhu, R.

Journal: Event Management

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 199-212

ISSN: 1525-9951

DOI: 10.3727/152599518X15173355843352

Abstract:

The study explores negative and positive impacts of events in both developing and developed nations. Using Zimbabwe and the UK as examples, the aim is to demonstrate the different ways event impacts affect different societies. The main finding was the discovery of a gap in existing event studies, clarifying that there are limited frameworks that are intended to gauge the scope of event impacts within emerging nations. In addition to this, events can result in negative and positive impacts and these are determined by the implementation of the event. This is fundamentally subjective to social, political, and economic impacts within the community, thus again questioning the literature in relation to developing nations.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26640/

Source: Scopus

A COMPARISON OF EVENT IMPACTS: ZIMBABWE AND THE UK

Authors: Sadd, D. and Musikavanhu, R.

Journal: EVENT MANAGEMENT

Volume: 22

Issue: 2

Pages: 199-212

eISSN: 1943-4308

ISSN: 1525-9951

DOI: 10.3727/152599518X15173355843352

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26640/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

A Comparison of Event Impacts: Zimbabwe and the UK

Authors: Sadd, D. and Musikavanhu, R.

Journal: Event Management: an international journal

Publisher: Cognizant Communication Corporation

ISSN: 1943-4308

Abstract:

The study explores negative and positive impacts of events in both developing and developed nations. Using Zimbabwe and The United Kingdom as examples, the aim is to demonstrate the different ways event impacts affect different societies. The main finding was the discovery of a gap in existing event studies, clarifying that there are limited frameworks that are intended to gauge the scope of event impacts within emerging nations. Additionally, settling that events can result in negative and positive impacts, however this is determined by the implementation of the event, which is fundamentally subjective to social, political and economic impacts within the community, thus again questioning the literature in relation to developing nations.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26640/

Source: Manual