Eye-tracking the own-gender bias in face recognition: Other-gender faces are viewed differently to own-gender faces

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Man, T.W. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/28614/

Journal: VISUAL COGNITION

Volume: 24

Issue: 9-10

Pages: 447-458

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2017.1301614

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Man, T.W. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/28614/

Journal: Visual Cognition

Volume: 24

Issue: 9-10

Pages: 447-458

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2017.1301614

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Research on the own-gender bias in face recognition has indicated an asymmetrical effect: an effect found only in women. We investigated the own-gender bias, using an eye-tracker to examine whether the own-gender bias is associated with differential processing strategies. We found an own-gender bias in our female participants. Our eye-tracking analysis indicated different scanning behaviours when processing own- and other-gender faces, with longer and more fixations to the eyes when viewing own-gender faces. Our results favour the socio-cognitive model, whilst acknowledging the role of perceptual expertise in the own-gender bias.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Man, T.W. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/28614/

Journal: VISUAL COGNITION

Volume: 24

Issue: 9-10

Pages: 447-458

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2017.1301614

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.