The Associations Between Children's and Adolescents' Suicidal and Self-Harming Behaviors, and Related Behaviors Within Their Social Networks: A Systematic Review

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Quigley, J., Rasmussen, S. and McAlaney, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29099/

Journal: Arch Suicide Res

Volume: 21

Issue: 2

Pages: 185-236

eISSN: 1543-6136

DOI: 10.1080/13811118.2016.1193075

Social influences-including the suicidal and self-harming behaviors of others-have been highlighted as a risk factor for suicidal and self-harming behavior in young people, but synthesis of the evidence is lacking. A systematic review of 86 relevant papers was conducted. Considerable published evidence was obtained for positive associations between young people's suicidal and self-harming behavior and that of people they know, with those reporting knowing people who had engaged in suicidal or self-harming behaviors more likely to report engaging in similar behaviors themselves. Findings are discussed in relation to a number of methodological and measurement issues-including the role of normative perceptions-and implications for the prevention of suicidal and self-harming behavior are considered.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Quigley, J., Rasmussen, S. and McAlaney, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29099/

Journal: Archives of Suicide Research

Volume: 21

Issue: 2

Pages: 185-236

eISSN: 1543-6136

ISSN: 1381-1118

DOI: 10.1080/13811118.2016.1193075

© 2017, Copyright © International Academy for Suicide Research. Social influences—including the suicidal and self-harming behaviors of others—have been highlighted as a risk factor for suicidal and self-harming behavior in young people, but synthesis of the evidence is lacking. A systematic review of 86 relevant papers was conducted. Considerable published evidence was obtained for positive associations between young people's suicidal and self-harming behavior and that of people they know, with those reporting knowing people who had engaged in suicidal or self-harming behaviors more likely to report engaging in similar behaviors themselves. Findings are discussed in relation to a number of methodological and measurement issues—including the role of normative perceptions—and implications for the prevention of suicidal and self-harming behavior are considered.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Quigley, J., Rasmussen, S. and McAlaney, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29099/

Journal: ARCHIVES OF SUICIDE RESEARCH

Volume: 21

Issue: 2

Pages: 185-236

eISSN: 1543-6136

ISSN: 1381-1118

DOI: 10.1080/13811118.2016.1193075

The data on this page was last updated at 04:56 on September 25, 2018.