'They know best': women's perceptions of midwifery care during labour and childbirth

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Bluff, R. and Holloway, I.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 10

Issue: 3

Pages: 157-164

ISSN: 0266-6138

The aims of the study were to examine women's experiences of their labour and the birth of their baby. The use of qualitative method ensured that the research focused on the perspectives of the participants. The purposive sample consisted of 11 women volunteers in a maternity unit of a general hospital. Unstructured, tape-recorded interviews provided an opportunity for the informants to express their thoughts and feelings. The constant comparative method, a feature of Grounded Theory, was used to analyse the data. The research demonstrated that women trust midwives because the latter are seen as experts who 'know best'. In doing so, women place themselves in the hands of professionals giving them the authority to make decisions about procedures, drugs and types of care. This belief in the professionals' expertise influences the type of relationship between the women and midwives. Nevertheless, women also want to take an active part in the control of labour. The study identified a need for a flexible relationship between women in labour and their midwives.

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This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bluff, R. and Holloway, I.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 10

Issue: 3

Pages: 157-164

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/0266-6138(94)90046-9

The aims of the study were to examine women's experiences of their labour and the birth of their baby. The use of qualitative method ensured that the research focused on the perspectives of the participants. The purposive sample consisted of 11 women volunteers in a maternity unit of a general hospital. Unstructured, tape-recorded interviews provided an opportunity for the informants to express their thoughts and feelings. The constant comparative method, a feature of Grounded Theory, was used to analyse the data. The research demonstrated that women trust midwives because the latter are seen as expects who 'know best'. In doing so, women place themselves in the hands of professionals giving them the authority to make decisions about procedures, drugs and types of care. This belief in the professionals' expertise influences the type of relationship between the women and midwives. Nevertheless, women also want to take take an active part in the control of labour. The study identified a need for a flexible relationship between women in labour and their midwives. © 1994.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Bluff, R. and Holloway, I.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 10

Issue: 3

Pages: 157-164

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

The aims of the study were to examine women's experiences of their labour and the birth of their baby. The use of qualitative method ensured that the research focused on the perspectives of the participants. The purposive sample consisted of 11 women volunteers in a maternity unit of a general hospital. Unstructured, tape-recorded interviews provided an opportunity for the informants to express their thoughts and feelings. The constant comparative method, a feature of Grounded Theory, was used to analyse the data. The research demonstrated that women trust midwives because the latter are seen as experts who 'know best'. In doing so, women place themselves in the hands of professionals giving them the authority to make decisions about procedures, drugs and types of care. This belief in the professionals' expertise influences the type of relationship between the women and midwives. Nevertheless, women also want to take an active part in the control of labour. The study identified a need for a flexible relationship between women in labour and their midwives.

The data on this page was last updated at 10:28 on April 24, 2019.