Readers and retailed literature : Findings from a UK public high street survey of purchasers' expectations from books

Authors: Frost, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29266/

Journal: LOGOS: The Journal of the World Book Community

Volume: 28

Issue: 2

Publisher: BRILL

ISSN: 0957-9656

Critical literature studies tend not to think about readers as customers and consumers or, in economic terms, end-users. From the Frankfurt School to World Literature, those critical studies have little to say about fiction from the viewpoint of readers as commercial actors aware of their participation in and construction of the market. But book retail, both online and off, remains the frame in which book-purchasing choices are made. To understand the hopes and desires of those readers, would it not make sense to ask them? Using the High Street bookshop as a metonymic site for reading within commodity culture, this article will present findings from a national survey with a corpus of 530 responses into expectations from purchased books. To ask what is expected from a book just purchased is simple, banal even, but collectively the answers to it can take the first tentative steps towards a political theory of reading, not from without, but from within our dominant economic frame.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Frost, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29266/

Journal: Logos (Netherlands)

Volume: 28

Issue: 2

Pages: 27-43

eISSN: 1878-4712

ISSN: 0957-9656

DOI: 10.1163/1878-4712-11112128

© 2017 LOGOS. Critical literature studies tend not to think about readers as customers and consumers or, in economic terms, end-users. From the Frankfurt School to World Literature, those critical studies have little to say about fiction from the viewpoint of readers as commercial actors aware of their participation in and construction of the market. But book retail, both online and off, remains the frame in which book-purchasing choices are made. To understand the hopes and desires of readers, would it not make sense to ask them? Using the high street bookshop as a metonymic site for reading within commodity culture, this article will present findings from a national survey with a corpus of 530 responses about expectations from purchased books. To ask what is expected from a book just purchased is simple, banal even, but collectively the answers to this question may provide the first tentative steps towards a political theory of reading, not from without, but from within our dominant economic frame.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Frost, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29266/

Journal: LOGOS-JOURNAL OF THE WORLD PUBLISHING COMMUNITY

Volume: 28

Issue: 2

Pages: 27-43

eISSN: 1878-4712

ISSN: 0957-9656

DOI: 10.1163/1878-4712-11112128

The data on this page was last updated at 05:12 on February 26, 2020.