Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: Human Psychopharmacology

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1099-1077

ISSN: 0885-6222

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

Abstract:

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: To investigate the profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS). Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted between May 2015 and February 2016 and included 19 databases. Search terms included “novel psychoactive substance(s),” “effect(s),” and “toxicity” and their synonyms. Studies included were those from any country, in any language, and between January 2007 and April 2015. Studies published before 2007 and those regarding the synthesis of NPS were excluded. Data were extracted by evaluating the titles, abstract, and full text, respectively. Consequently, the extraction yielded 20 studies. Results: Forty-three NPS derivatives of 8 main pharmacological classes were identified. NPS were mostly used among young adults and adults within the age range of 16–64 years old. Cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids were the most prevalent among the aforementioned classes. The main desired effects of NPS use were empathy and increased ability to socialise. Reported toxicity associated with the use of NPS included cardiovascular, neurological, and psychoactive adverse reactions. Conclusions: Despite the unique subjective effects associated with the use of NPS, harmful effects could be severe and/or lethal. Therefore, there is a need to develop research in the area of NPS and promote awareness among healthcare professionals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: Scopus

Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: Human Psychopharmacology

eISSN: 1099-1077

ISSN: 0885-6222

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

Abstract:

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: To investigate the profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS). Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted between May 2015 and February 2016 and included 19 databases. Search terms included "novel psychoactive substance(s)," "effect(s)," and "toxicity" and their synonyms. Studies included were those from any country, in any language, and between January 2007 and April 2015. Studies published before 2007 and those regarding the synthesis of NPS were excluded. Data were extracted by evaluating the titles, abstract, and full text, respectively. Consequently, the extraction yielded 20 studies. Results: Forty-three NPS derivatives of 8 main pharmacological classes were identified. NPS were mostly used among young adults and adults within the age range of 16-64 years old. Cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids were the most prevalent among the aforementioned classes. The main desired effects of NPS use were empathy and increased ability to socialise. Reported toxicity associated with the use of NPS included cardiovascular, neurological, and psychoactive adverse reactions. Conclusions: Despite the unique subjective effects associated with the use of NPS, harmful effects could be severe and/or lethal. Therefore, there is a need to develop research in the area of NPS and promote awareness among healthcare professionals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: Scopus

Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: Human Psychopharmacology

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1099-1077

ISSN: 0885-6222

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

Abstract:

Objective: To investigate the profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS). Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted between May 2015 and February 2016 and included 19 databases. Search terms included “novel psychoactive substance(s),” “effect(s),” and “toxicity” and their synonyms. Studies included were those from any country, in any language, and between January 2007 and April 2015. Studies published before 2007 and those regarding the synthesis of NPS were excluded. Data were extracted by evaluating the titles, abstract, and full text, respectively. Consequently, the extraction yielded 20 studies. Results: Forty-three NPS derivatives of 8 main pharmacological classes were identified. NPS were mostly used among young adults and adults within the age range of 16–64 years old. Cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids were the most prevalent among the aforementioned classes. The main desired effects of NPS use were empathy and increased ability to socialise. Reported toxicity associated with the use of NPS included cardiovascular, neurological, and psychoactive adverse reactions. Conclusions: Despite the unique subjective effects associated with the use of NPS, harmful effects could be severe and/or lethal. Therefore, there is a need to develop research in the area of NPS and promote awareness among healthcare professionals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: Scopus

Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies.

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: Hum Psychopharmacol

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1099-1077

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS). METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted between May 2015 and February 2016 and included 19 databases. Search terms included "novel psychoactive substance(s)," "effect(s)," and "toxicity" and their synonyms. Studies included were those from any country, in any language, and between January 2007 and April 2015. Studies published before 2007 and those regarding the synthesis of NPS were excluded. Data were extracted by evaluating the titles, abstract, and full text, respectively. Consequently, the extraction yielded 20 studies. RESULTS: Forty-three NPS derivatives of 8 main pharmacological classes were identified. NPS were mostly used among young adults and adults within the age range of 16-64 years old. Cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids were the most prevalent among the aforementioned classes. The main desired effects of NPS use were empathy and increased ability to socialise. Reported toxicity associated with the use of NPS included cardiovascular, neurological, and psychoactive adverse reactions. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the unique subjective effects associated with the use of NPS, harmful effects could be severe and/or lethal. Therefore, there is a need to develop research in the area of NPS and promote awareness among healthcare professionals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: PubMed

Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1099-1077

ISSN: 0885-6222

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances: A systematic review of quantitative studies.

Authors: Assi, S., Gulyamova, N., Ibrahim, K., Kneller, P. and Osselton, D.

Journal: Human psychopharmacology

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1099-1077

ISSN: 0885-6222

DOI: 10.1002/hup.2607

Abstract:

Objective

To investigate the profile, effects, and toxicity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS).

Methods

A systematic literature review was conducted between May 2015 and February 2016 and included 19 databases. Search terms included "novel psychoactive substance(s)," "effect(s)," and "toxicity" and their synonyms. Studies included were those from any country, in any language, and between January 2007 and April 2015. Studies published before 2007 and those regarding the synthesis of NPS were excluded. Data were extracted by evaluating the titles, abstract, and full text, respectively. Consequently, the extraction yielded 20 studies.

Results

Forty-three NPS derivatives of 8 main pharmacological classes were identified. NPS were mostly used among young adults and adults within the age range of 16-64 years old. Cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids were the most prevalent among the aforementioned classes. The main desired effects of NPS use were empathy and increased ability to socialise. Reported toxicity associated with the use of NPS included cardiovascular, neurological, and psychoactive adverse reactions.

Conclusions

Despite the unique subjective effects associated with the use of NPS, harmful effects could be severe and/or lethal. Therefore, there is a need to develop research in the area of NPS and promote awareness among healthcare professionals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29553/

Source: Europe PubMed Central