A mixed methods evaluation of team-based learning for applied pathophysiology in undergraduate nursing education

Authors: Branney, J. and Priego-Hernández, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30109/

Journal: Nurse Education Today

Publisher: Churchill Livingstone

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014

Background

It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams.

Objectives

In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses.

Design

A mixed methods observational study

Methods

In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning -taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material.

Results

Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those related to lecture-taught material.

Conclusions

Most students had a preference for, and reported higher accountability and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Through contextualisation and teamwork, Team-based Learning appears to be a strategy that confers strong pedagogical benefits for teaching applied pathophysiology (bioscience) to student nurses.

Keywords TBL; Team-based Learning; biosciences in nurse education; applied pathophysiology; evidence-informed decision making

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Branney, J. and Priego-Hernández, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30109/

Journal: Nurse Educ Today

Volume: 61

Pages: 127-133

eISSN: 1532-2793

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014

BACKGROUND: It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams. OBJECTIVES: In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses. DESIGN: A mixed methods observational study. METHODS: In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning-taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material. RESULTS: Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those related to lecture-taught material. CONCLUSIONS: Most students had a preference for, and reported higher accountability and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Through contextualisation and teamwork, Team-based Learning appears to be a strategy that confers strong pedagogical benefits for teaching applied pathophysiology (bioscience) to student nurses.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Branney, J. and Priego-Hernández, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30109/

Journal: Nurse Education Today

Volume: 61

Pages: 127-133

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014

© 2017 The Authors Background It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams. Objectives In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses. Design A mixed methods observational study. Methods In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning-taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material. Results Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those related to lecture-taught material. Conclusions Most students had a preference for, and reported higher accountability and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Through contextualisation and teamwork, Team-based Learning appears to be a strategy that confers strong pedagogical benefits for teaching applied pathophysiology (bioscience) to student nurses.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Branney, J. and Priego-Hernandez, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30109/

Journal: NURSE EDUCATION TODAY

Volume: 61

Pages: 127-133

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 27, 2020.