Happy to help? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of performing acts of kindness on the well-being of the actor

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Curry, O.S., Rowland, L.A., Van Lissa, C.J., Zlotowitz, S., McAlaney, J. and Whitehouse, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30561/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Volume: 76

Pages: 320-329

eISSN: 1096-0465

ISSN: 0022-1031

DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2018.02.014

© 2018 The Authors Do acts of kindness improve the well-being of the actor? Recent advances in the behavioural sciences have provided a number of explanations of human social, cooperative and altruistic behaviour. These theories predict that people will be ‘happy to help’ family, friends, community members, spouses, and even strangers under some conditions. Here we conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the experimental evidence that kindness interventions (for example, performing ‘random acts of kindness’) boost subjective well-being. Our initial search of the literature identified 489 articles; of which 24 (27 studies) met the inclusion criteria (total N = 4045). These 27 studies, some of which included multiple control conditions and dependent measures, yielded 52 effect sizes. Multi-level modeling revealed that the overall effect of kindness on the well-being of the actor is small-to-medium (δ = 0.28). The effect was not moderated by sex, age, type of participant, intervention, control condition or outcome measure. There was no indication of publication bias. We discuss the limitations of the current literature, and recommend that future research test more specific theories of kindness: taking kindness-specific individual differences into account; distinguishing between the effects of kindness to specific categories of people; and considering a wider range of proximal and distal outcomes. Such research will advance our understanding of the causes and consequences of kindness, and help practitioners to maximise the effectiveness of kindness interventions to improve well-being.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Curry, O.S., Rowland, L.A., Van Lissa, C.J., Zlotowitz, S., McAlaney, J. and Whitehouse, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30561/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 76

Pages: 320-329

eISSN: 1096-0465

ISSN: 0022-1031

DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2018.02.014

The data on this page was last updated at 04:49 on July 15, 2018.