Exploring the contribution of motivation and experience in the Postpubescent Own-Gender Bias in face recognition

Authors: Hills, P., Pake, J.M., Dempsey, J.R. and Lewis, M.B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30586/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Publisher: American Psychological Association

ISSN: 0096-1523

The own-gender bias in face recognition has been hypothesised to be the result of extensive experience with own-gender faces, coupled with a motivation to process own-group faces more deeply than other-group faces. We test the effect of experience and motivation in four experiments employing standard old/new recognition paradigms. In Experiment 1, no own-gender recognition bias was observed following an attractiveness-rating encoding task regardless of school type (single- or mixed-sex). Experiment 2, which used a distinctiveness-rating encoding task, did find a significant own-gender bias for all groups of participants. Experiment 3 on adults found that the own-gender bias was not affected by self-reported contact with the other-gender, but the encoding task did moderate the size of the bias. Experiment 4 revealed that participants with an own-gender sexual orientation showed a stronger own-gender bias. These results indicate that motivational factors influence the own-gender bias whereas no evidence was found for perceptual experience.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Pake, J.M., Dempsey, J.R. and Lewis, M.B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30586/

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 44

Issue: 9

Pages: 1426-1446

eISSN: 1939-1277

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000533

The own-gender bias in face recognition has been hypothesized to be the result of extensive experience with own-gender faces, coupled with a motivation to process own-group faces more deeply than other-group faces. We test the effect of experience and motivation in four experiments employing standard old/new recognition paradigms. In Experiment 1, no own-gender recognition bias was observed following an attractiveness-rating encoding task regardless of school type (single- or mixed-sex). Experiment 2, which used a distinctiveness-rating encoding task, did find a significant own-gender bias for all groups of participants. Experiment 3 on adults found that the own-gender bias was not affected by self-reported contact with the other-gender, but the encoding task did moderate the size of the bias. Experiment 4 revealed that participants with an own-gender sexual orientation showed a stronger own-gender bias. These results indicate that motivational factors influence the own-gender bias whereas no evidence was found for perceptual experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Pake, J.M., Dempsey, J.R. and Lewis, M.B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30586/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 44

Issue: 9

Pages: 1426-1446

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000533

© 2018 American Psychological Association. The own-gender bias in face recognition has been hypothesized to be the result of extensive experience with own-gender faces, coupled with a motivation to process own-group faces more deeply than other-group faces. We test the effect of experience and motivation in four experiments employing standard old/new recognition paradigms. In Experiment 1, no own-gender recognition bias was observed following an attractiveness-rating encoding task regardless of school type (single- or mixed-sex). Experiment 2, which used a distinctiveness-rating encoding task, did find a significant own-gender bias for all groups of participants. Experiment 3 on adults found that the own-gender bias was not affected by self-reported contact with the other-gender, but the encoding task did moderate the size of the bias. Experiment 4 revealed that participants with an own-gender sexual orientation showed a stronger own-gender bias. These results indicate that motivational factors influence the own-gender bias whereas no evidence was found for perceptual experience.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hills, P.J., Pake, J.M., Dempsey, J.R. and Lewis, M.B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30586/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE

Volume: 44

Issue: 9

Pages: 1426-1446

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000533

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.