Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America

Authors: Bustos, D., Budka, M., Reynolds, S.C., Bennett, M.R. et al.

Journal: Science Advances

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

eISSN: 2375-2548

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

Abstract:

Predator-prey interactions revealed by vertebrate trace fossils are extremely rare. We present footprint evidence from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico for the association of sloth and human trackways. Geologically, the sloth and human trackways were made contemporaneously, and the sloth trackways show evidence of evasion and defensive behavior when associated with human tracks. Behavioral inferences from these trackways indicate prey selection and suggest that humans were harassing, stalking, and/or hunting the now-extinct giant ground sloth in the terminal Pleistocene.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30670/

Source: Scopus

Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America.

Authors: Bustos, D., Budka, M., Reynolds, S.C., Bennett, M.R. et al.

Journal: Sci Adv

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Pages: eaar7621

eISSN: 2375-2548

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

Abstract:

Predator-prey interactions revealed by vertebrate trace fossils are extremely rare. We present footprint evidence from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico for the association of sloth and human trackways. Geologically, the sloth and human trackways were made contemporaneously, and the sloth trackways show evidence of evasion and defensive behavior when associated with human tracks. Behavioral inferences from these trackways indicate prey selection and suggest that humans were harassing, stalking, and/or hunting the now-extinct giant ground sloth in the terminal Pleistocene.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30670/

Source: PubMed

Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America

Authors: Bustos, D., Budka, M., Reynolds, S.C., Bennett, M.R. et al.

Journal: SCIENCE ADVANCES

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

ISSN: 2375-2548

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30670/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America

Authors: Bustos, D., Budka, M., Reynolds, S., Bennett, M. et al.

Journal: Science Advances

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science

eISSN: 2375-2548

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

Abstract:

Predator-prey interactions revealed by vertebrate trace fossils are extremely rare. We present footprint evidence from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico for the association of sloth and human trackways. Geologically, the sloth and human trackways were made contemporaneously, and the sloth trackways show evidence of evasion and defensive behavior when associated with human tracks. Behavioral inferences from these trackways indicate prey selection and suggest that humans were harassing, stalking, and/or hunting the now-extinct giant ground sloth in the terminal Pleistocene.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30670/

Source: Manual

Footprints preserve terminal Pleistocene hunt? Human-sloth interactions in North America.

Authors: Bustos, D., Budka, M., Reynolds, S.C., Bennett, M.R. et al.

Journal: Science advances

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Pages: eaar7621

eISSN: 2375-2548

ISSN: 2375-2548

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar7621

Abstract:

Predator-prey interactions revealed by vertebrate trace fossils are extremely rare. We present footprint evidence from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico for the association of sloth and human trackways. Geologically, the sloth and human trackways were made contemporaneously, and the sloth trackways show evidence of evasion and defensive behavior when associated with human tracks. Behavioral inferences from these trackways indicate prey selection and suggest that humans were harassing, stalking, and/or hunting the now-extinct giant ground sloth in the terminal Pleistocene.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30670/

Source: Europe PubMed Central