Blood pressure and hypertension in adults permanently living at high altitude: A systematic review and meta-analysis

This source preferred by Nirmal Aryal

Authors: Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatta, Y.K.D. and Mann, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31340/

Journal: HIGH ALTITUDE MEDICINE & BIOLOGY

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 185-193

eISSN: 1557-8682

ISSN: 1527-0297

DOI: 10.1089/ham.2015.0118

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatta, Y.K.D. and Mann, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31340/

Journal: High Alt Med Biol

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 185-193

eISSN: 1557-8682

DOI: 10.1089/ham.2015.0118

Aryal, Nirmal, Mark Weatherall, Yadav Kumar Deo Bhatta, and Stewart Mann. Blood pressure and hypertension in adults permanently living at high altitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis. High Alt Med Biol. 17:185-193, 2016.-The objective of this study was to estimate the associations between altitude and mean blood pressure (BP) (or prevalence of hypertension [HT]) in adults who live permanently at high altitude. A literature search was conducted in December 2014 using PubMed, Scopus, and OvidSP (MedLine and EMBASE) databases to identify relevant observational studies. Inclusion criteria were reports of studies in populations permanently living at an altitude of ≥2400 m and in those 18 years or older. Meta-regression was used to estimate the association between average BP and HT and altitude. We identified 3375 articles and inclusion criteria were met for 21 reports, which included a total of 40,854 participants. Random-effects meta-regression estimated that for every 1000 m elevation the average systolic BP (SBP) (95% confidence interval [CI]) increased by 17 mmHg (0.2 to 33.8), p = 0.05 and diastolic BP (DBP) by 9.5 mmHg (0.6 to 18.4), p = 0.04 in participants with Tibetan origin. By contrast, in participants with non-Tibetan origin, average SBP decreased by 5.9 mmHg (-19.1 to 7.3), p = 0.38 and DBP by 4 mmHg (-13 to 5), p = 0.38. The odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with HT per 1000 m increment in the altitude were 2.01 (0.37 to 11.02), p = 0.446 and 4.05 (0.07 to 244.69), p = 0.489 for Tibetan and non-Tibetan participants, respectively. Sensitivity analysis excluding two studies with older participants (≥60 years) reversed the direction of this effect in non-Tibetans with odds ratio (95% CI) of 0.10 (0.004 to 2.22) per 1000 m, p = 0.143. Overall, this review suggests weak association between BP and altitude in Tibetan origin populations.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatta, Y.K.D. and Mann, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31340/

Journal: High Altitude Medicine and Biology

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 185-193

eISSN: 1557-8682

ISSN: 1527-0297

DOI: 10.1089/ham.2015.0118

© Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016. The objective of this study was to estimate the associations between altitude and mean blood pressure (BP) (or prevalence of hypertension [HT]) in adults who live permanently at high altitude. A literature search was conducted in December 2014 using PubMed, Scopus, and OvidSP (MedLine and EMBASE) databases to identify relevant observational studies. Inclusion criteria were reports of studies in populations permanently living at an altitude of ≥2400 m and in those 18 years or older. Meta-regression was used to estimate the association between average BP and HT and altitude. We identified 3375 articles and inclusion criteria were met for 21 reports, which included a total of 40,854 participants. Random-effects meta-regression estimated that for every 1000 m elevation the average systolic BP (SBP) (95% confidence interval [CI]) increased by 17 mmHg (0.2 to 33.8), p = 0.05 and diastolic BP (DBP) by 9.5 mmHg (0.6 to 18.4), p = 0.04 in participants with Tibetan origin. By contrast, in participants with non-Tibetan origin, average SBP decreased by 5.9 mmHg (-19.1 to 7.3), p = 0.38 and DBP by 4 mmHg (-13 to 5), p = 0.38. The odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with HT per 1000 m increment in the altitude were 2.01 (0.37 to 11.02), p = 0.446 and 4.05 (0.07 to 244.69), p = 0.489 for Tibetan and non-Tibetan participants, respectively. Sensitivity analysis excluding two studies with older participants (≥60 years) reversed the direction of this effect in non-Tibetans with odds ratio (95% CI) of 0.10 (0.004 to 2.22) per 1000 m, p = 0.143. Overall, this review suggests weak association between BP and altitude in Tibetan origin populations.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Aryal, N., Weatherall, M., Bhatta, Y.K.D. and Mann, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31340/

Journal: HIGH ALTITUDE MEDICINE & BIOLOGY

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 185-193

eISSN: 1557-8682

ISSN: 1527-0297

DOI: 10.1089/ham.2015.0118

The data on this page was last updated at 08:57 on June 9, 2020.