Performance Pay and Applicant Screening

Authors: Mohrenweiser, J. and Jirjahn, U.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31156/

Journal: British Journal of Industrial Relations

Volume: 57

Issue: 3

Pages: 540-575

DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12443

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Jirjahn, U. and Mohrenweiser, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31156/

Journal: British Journal of Industrial Relations

Volume: 57

Issue: 3

Pages: 540-575

eISSN: 1467-8543

ISSN: 0007-1080

DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12443

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Using German establishment data, we show that the relationship between intensity of individual-based performance pay and intensity of applicant screening depends on the nature of production. In establishments with increased multitasking, performance pay is positively associated with applicant screening. By contrast, in establishments without increased multitasking, performance pay is negatively associated with applicant screening. We do not find a similar pattern of results for group-based performance pay or profit-sharing. Our findings fit the hypothesis that individual-based performance pay induces a positive self-sorting of employees if jobs are less multifaceted. In this case, employers with a high intensity of performance pay do not need intensive applicant screening to ensure a high quality of matches between workers and jobs. However, if jobs are more multifaceted, individual-based performance pay can entail problems of adverse self-sorting. In order to mitigate or overcome these problems, employers making intensive use of performance pay also screen applicants more intensively.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Jirjahn, U. and Mohrenweiser, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31156/

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

Volume: 57

Issue: 3

Pages: 540-575

eISSN: 1467-8543

ISSN: 0007-1080

DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12443

The data on this page was last updated at 05:23 on February 23, 2021.