Perceived race affects configural processing but not holistic processing in the composite-face task

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31219/

Journal: Front Psychol

Volume: 9

Pages: 1456

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01456

One explanation for the own-race bias in face recognition is the loss of holistic processing for other-race faces. The composite-face task (involving matching the top halves of faces when the bottom halves are either changed or the same) tests holistic processing but it has been inconsistent in revealing other-race effects. Two composite-face experiments are reported using pairs of faces that have common internal features but can be perceived as either being racially Black or White depending on their external features. In Experiment 1 (matching the top halves of faces) holistic processing was found for both face races for White participants (shown by both a mis-alignment advantage when bottom halves were different and also by a congruence-by-alignment interaction in discrimination). Bayesian analysis supported there being no effect of race. However, the size of the simple congruence effect was larger for own- than for other-race faces. Experiment 2 found that this race-by-congruence interaction was not present when matching the bottom halves of faces. The results are interpreted in of terms of the perceived race affecting the processing of second-order relational information rather than holistic processing.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31219/

Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Volume: 9

Issue: AUG

eISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01456

© 2018 Lewis and Hills. One explanation for the own-race bias in face recognition is the loss of holistic processing for other-race faces. The composite-face task (involving matching the top halves of faces when the bottom halves are either changed or the same) tests holistic processing but it has been inconsistent in revealing other-race effects. Two composite-face experiments are reported using pairs of faces that have common internal features but can be perceived as either being racially Black or White depending on their external features. In Experiment 1 (matching the top halves of faces) holistic processing was found for both face races for White participants (shown by both a mis-alignment advantage when bottom halves were different and also by a congruence-by-alignment interaction in discrimination). Bayesian analysis supported there being no effect of race. However, the size of the simple congruence effect was larger for own- than for other-race faces. Experiment 2 found that this race-by-congruence interaction was not present when matching the bottom halves of faces. The results are interpreted in of terms of the perceived race affecting the processing of second-order relational information rather than holistic processing.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31219/

Journal: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 9

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01456

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.