The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: Women and Birth

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-283

eISSN: 1878-1799

ISSN: 1871-5192

DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.160

Abstract:

Background: Despite breastfeeding providing maximum health benefits to mother and baby, many women in the United Kingdom do not breastfeed, or do so briefly. Purpose: Using tenets of ethnography, this study aimed to explore the everyday experiences of first time breastfeeding mothers in the early weeks following birth. Methods: Using a camcorder, five mothers in the United Kingdom captured their real-time experiences in a video diary, until they perceived their infant feeding was established. Using a multidimensional approach to analysis, we examined how five mothers interacted with the camcorder as they shared their emotions, feelings, thoughts and actions in real-time. Findings: Mothers recorded 294 video clips, total recording time exceeded 43 h. This paper focuses on one theme, the therapeutic role of the camcorder in qualitative research. Four subthemes are discussed highlighting the therapeutic impact of talking to the camcorder: personifying the camcorder; using the camcorder as a confidante; a sounding board; and a mirror and motivator. Conclusion: Frequent opportunities to relieve tension by talking to “someone” without interruption, judgement or advice can be therapeutic. Further research needs to explore how the video diary method can be integrated into standard postnatal care to provide benefits for a wider population.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: Scopus

The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers.

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: Women Birth

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-283

eISSN: 1878-1799

DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.160

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Despite breastfeeding providing maximum health benefits to mother and baby, many women in the United Kingdom do not breastfeed, or do so briefly. PURPOSE: Using tenets of ethnography, this study aimed to explore the everyday experiences of first time breastfeeding mothers in the early weeks following birth. METHODS: Using a camcorder, five mothers in the United Kingdom captured their real-time experiences in a video diary, until they perceived their infant feeding was established. Using a multidimensional approach to analysis, we examined how five mothers interacted with the camcorder as they shared their emotions, feelings, thoughts and actions in real-time. FINDINGS: Mothers recorded 294 video clips, total recording time exceeded 43h. This paper focuses on one theme, the therapeutic role of the camcorder in qualitative research. Four subthemes are discussed highlighting the therapeutic impact of talking to the camcorder: personifying the camcorder; using the camcorder as a confidante; a sounding board; and a mirror and motivator. CONCLUSION: Frequent opportunities to relieve tension by talking to "someone" without interruption, judgement or advice can be therapeutic. Further research needs to explore how the video diary method can be integrated into standard postnatal care to provide benefits for a wider population.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: PubMed

The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: WOMEN AND BIRTH

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-283

eISSN: 1878-1799

ISSN: 1871-5192

DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.160

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: Women and Birth

eISSN: 1878-1799

ISSN: 1871-5192

DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.160

Abstract:

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: Despite breastfeeding providing maximum health benefits to mother and baby, many women in the United Kingdom do not breastfeed, or do so briefly. Purpose: Using tenets of ethnography, this study aimed to explore the everyday experiences of first time breastfeeding mothers in the early weeks following birth. Methods: Using a camcorder, five mothers in the United Kingdom captured their real-time experiences in a video diary, until they perceived their infant feeding was established. Using a multidimensional approach to analysis, we examined how five mothers interacted with the camcorder as they shared their emotions, feelings, thoughts and actions in real-time. Findings: Mothers recorded 294 video clips, total recording time exceeded 43 h. This paper focuses on one theme, the therapeutic role of the camcorder in qualitative research. Four subthemes are discussed highlighting the therapeutic impact of talking to the camcorder: personifying the camcorder; using the camcorder as a confidante; a sounding board; and a mirror and motivator. Conclusion: Frequent opportunities to relieve tension by talking to “someone” without interruption, judgement or advice can be therapeutic. Further research needs to explore how the video diary method can be integrated into standard postnatal care to provide benefits for a wider population.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Edwin van Teijlingen

The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers.

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: Women and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwives

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-283

eISSN: 1878-1799

ISSN: 1871-5192

DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.160

Abstract:

Background

Despite breastfeeding providing maximum health benefits to mother and baby, many women in the United Kingdom do not breastfeed, or do so briefly.

Purpose

Using tenets of ethnography, this study aimed to explore the everyday experiences of first time breastfeeding mothers in the early weeks following birth.

Methods

Using a camcorder, five mothers in the United Kingdom captured their real-time experiences in a video diary, until they perceived their infant feeding was established. Using a multidimensional approach to analysis, we examined how five mothers interacted with the camcorder as they shared their emotions, feelings, thoughts and actions in real-time.

Findings

Mothers recorded 294 video clips, total recording time exceeded 43h. This paper focuses on one theme, the therapeutic role of the camcorder in qualitative research. Four subthemes are discussed highlighting the therapeutic impact of talking to the camcorder: personifying the camcorder; using the camcorder as a confidante; a sounding board; and a mirror and motivator.

Conclusion

Frequent opportunities to relieve tension by talking to "someone" without interruption, judgement or advice can be therapeutic. Further research needs to explore how the video diary method can be integrated into standard postnatal care to provide benefits for a wider population.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

The therapeutic role of video diaries: A qualitative study involving breastfeeding mothers.

Authors: Taylor, A.M., van Teijlingen, E., Alexander, J. and Ryan, K.M.

Journal: Women and Birth

Volume: 32

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-283

ISSN: 1871-5192

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Despite breastfeeding providing maximum health benefits to mother and baby, many women in the United Kingdom do not breastfeed, or do so briefly. PURPOSE: Using tenets of ethnography, this study aimed to explore the everyday experiences of first time breastfeeding mothers in the early weeks following birth. METHODS: Using a camcorder, five mothers in the United Kingdom captured their real-time experiences in a video diary, until they perceived their infant feeding was established. Using a multidimensional approach to analysis, we examined how five mothers interacted with the camcorder as they shared their emotions, feelings, thoughts and actions in real-time. FINDINGS: Mothers recorded 294 video clips, total recording time exceeded 43h. This paper focuses on one theme, the therapeutic role of the camcorder in qualitative research. Four subthemes are discussed highlighting the therapeutic impact of talking to the camcorder: personifying the camcorder; using the camcorder as a confidante; a sounding board; and a mirror and motivator. CONCLUSION: Frequent opportunities to relieve tension by talking to "someone" without interruption, judgement or advice can be therapeutic. Further research needs to explore how the video diary method can be integrated into standard postnatal care to provide benefits for a wider population.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31406/

Source: BURO EPrints