Surprise as an explanation to auditory novelty distraction and post-error slowing

This source preferred by Martin Vasilev

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Vasilev, M.R. and Andrés, P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31446/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

Volume: 148

Issue: 1

Pages: 192-200

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/xge0000497

© 2018 American Psychological Association. Performance in sustained attention tasks is known to be slowed by the occurrence of unexpected task-irrelevant distractors (novelty distraction) and the detection of errors (posterror slowing), 2 wellestablished phenomena studied separately and regarded as reflecting distinct underpinning mechanisms. We measured novelty distraction and posterror slowing in an auditory-visual oddball task to test the hypothesis that they both involve an orienting response. Our results confirm that the 2 effects exhibit a positive interaction. We show that a trial-by-trial measure of surprise credibly accounts for our empirical data. We suggest that novelty distraction and posterror slowing both reflect an orienting response to unexpected events and a reappraisal of action plans.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Vasilev, M.R. and Andrés, P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31446/

Journal: J Exp Psychol Gen

Volume: 148

Issue: 1

Pages: 192-200

eISSN: 1939-2222

DOI: 10.1037/xge0000497

Performance in sustained attention tasks is known to be slowed by the occurrence of unexpected task-irrelevant distractors (novelty distraction) and the detection of errors (posterror slowing), 2 well-established phenomena studied separately and regarded as reflecting distinct underpinning mechanisms. We measured novelty distraction and posterror slowing in an auditory-visual oddball task to test the hypothesis that they both involve an orienting response. Our results confirm that the 2 effects exhibit a positive interaction. We show that a trial-by-trial measure of surprise credibly accounts for our empirical data. We suggest that novelty distraction and posterror slowing both reflect an orienting response to unexpected events and a reappraisal of action plans. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Vasilev, M.R. and Andrés, P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31446/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

Volume: 148

Issue: 1

Pages: 192-200

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/xge0000497

© 2018 American Psychological Association. Performance in sustained attention tasks is known to be slowed by the occurrence of unexpected task-irrelevant distractors (novelty distraction) and the detection of errors (posterror slowing), 2 wellestablished phenomena studied separately and regarded as reflecting distinct underpinning mechanisms. We measured novelty distraction and posterror slowing in an auditory-visual oddball task to test the hypothesis that they both involve an orienting response. Our results confirm that the 2 effects exhibit a positive interaction. We show that a trial-by-trial measure of surprise credibly accounts for our empirical data. We suggest that novelty distraction and posterror slowing both reflect an orienting response to unexpected events and a reappraisal of action plans.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Vasilev, M.R. and Andres, P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31446/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-GENERAL

Volume: 148

Issue: 1

Pages: 192-200

eISSN: 1939-2222

ISSN: 0096-3445

DOI: 10.1037/xge0000497

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 20, 2020.