Individual differences in spelling ability influence phonological processing during visual word recognition

Authors: Yates, M. and Slattery, T.J.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 187

Pages: 139-149

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.02.015

Abstract:

In the research reported here, we investigated how phonological processing in the lexical decision task is influenced by individual differences in the reading and spelling abilities of participants. We used phonological neighborhood spread as a measure of phonological processing. Spread refers to the number of phoneme positions in a word that can be changed to form a phonological neighbor. Replicating previous research, we found that words forming neighbors across three positions (P3) were recognized more rapidly than those forming neighbors across only two positions (P2). Importantly, we found that this spread effect interacted with spelling ability. The difference between P3 and P2 was largest when spelling recognition was high and spelling production low. These opposing effects of spelling ability are explained in terms of a language system that consists of separate orthographic systems for reading and spelling. Although these two orthographic systems are separate, they share information through a shared response buffer (Jones & Rawson, 2016). Within this framework, it is argued that lexical decisions are made once the information in the response buffer reaches threshold and that time to reach this threshold is influenced by two sources. One is the quality of the orthographic connections in the reading system and is measured by spelling recognition. The other is the quality of the orthographic connections in the spelling system and is measured by spelling production.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31957/

Source: Scopus

Individual differences in spelling ability influence phonological processing during visual word recognition.

Authors: Yates, M. and Slattery, T.J.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 187

Pages: 139-149

eISSN: 1873-7838

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.02.015

Abstract:

In the research reported here, we investigated how phonological processing in the lexical decision task is influenced by individual differences in the reading and spelling abilities of participants. We used phonological neighborhood spread as a measure of phonological processing. Spread refers to the number of phoneme positions in a word that can be changed to form a phonological neighbor. Replicating previous research, we found that words forming neighbors across three positions (P3) were recognized more rapidly than those forming neighbors across only two positions (P2). Importantly, we found that this spread effect interacted with spelling ability. The difference between P3 and P2 was largest when spelling recognition was high and spelling production low. These opposing effects of spelling ability are explained in terms of a language system that consists of separate orthographic systems for reading and spelling. Although these two orthographic systems are separate, they share information through a shared response buffer (Jones & Rawson, 2016). Within this framework, it is argued that lexical decisions are made once the information in the response buffer reaches threshold and that time to reach this threshold is influenced by two sources. One is the quality of the orthographic connections in the reading system and is measured by spelling recognition. The other is the quality of the orthographic connections in the spelling system and is measured by spelling production.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31957/

Source: PubMed

Individual differences in spelling ability influence phonological processing during visual word recognition

Authors: Yates, M. and Slattery, T.J.

Journal: COGNITION

Volume: 187

Pages: 139-149

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.02.015

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31957/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Individual Differences in Spelling Ability Influence Phonological Processing during Visual Word Recognition

Authors: Yates, M. and Slattery, T.

Journal: Cognition

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0010-0277

Abstract:

In the research reported here, we investigated how phonological processing in the lexical decision task is influenced by individual differences in the reading and spelling abilities of participants. We used phonological neighborhood spread as a measure of phonological processing. Spread refers to the number of phoneme positions in a word that can be changed to form a phonological neighbor. Replicating previous research, we found that words forming neighbors across three positions (P3) were recognized more rapidly than those forming neighbors across only two positions (P2). Importantly, we found that this spread effect interacted with spelling ability. The difference between P3 and P2 was largest when spelling recognition was high and spelling production low. These opposing effects of spelling ability are explained in terms of a language system that consists of separate orthographic systems for reading and spelling. Although these two orthographic systems are separate, they share information through a shared response buffer (Jones & Rawson, 2016). Within this framework, it is argued that lexical decisions are made once the information in the response buffer reaches threshold and that time to reach this threshold is influenced by two sources. One is the quality of the orthographic connections in the reading system and is measured by spelling recognition. The other is the quality of the orthographic connections in the spelling system and is measured by spelling production.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31957/

Source: Manual

Individual differences in spelling ability influence phonological processing during visual word recognition.

Authors: Yates, M. and Slattery, T.J.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 187

Pages: 139-149

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.02.015

Abstract:

In the research reported here, we investigated how phonological processing in the lexical decision task is influenced by individual differences in the reading and spelling abilities of participants. We used phonological neighborhood spread as a measure of phonological processing. Spread refers to the number of phoneme positions in a word that can be changed to form a phonological neighbor. Replicating previous research, we found that words forming neighbors across three positions (P3) were recognized more rapidly than those forming neighbors across only two positions (P2). Importantly, we found that this spread effect interacted with spelling ability. The difference between P3 and P2 was largest when spelling recognition was high and spelling production low. These opposing effects of spelling ability are explained in terms of a language system that consists of separate orthographic systems for reading and spelling. Although these two orthographic systems are separate, they share information through a shared response buffer (Jones & Rawson, 2016). Within this framework, it is argued that lexical decisions are made once the information in the response buffer reaches threshold and that time to reach this threshold is influenced by two sources. One is the quality of the orthographic connections in the reading system and is measured by spelling recognition. The other is the quality of the orthographic connections in the spelling system and is measured by spelling production.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31957/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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