An ordinary life: People with dementia living in a residential setting

Authors: Brannelly, T., Gilmour, J.A., O’Reilly, H., Leighton, M. and Woodford, A.

Journal: Dementia

Volume: 18

Issue: 2

Pages: 757-768

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217693169

Abstract:

The aim of this research was to explore the experiences of care support workers and family members of the impact of a new care approach in a specialised unit as it shifted from a clinical to an inclusive model, focused on creating an ordinary life for people with dementia and their families. The research was a partnership between the unit staff and university researchers. Using a qualitative approach, data were collected in focus groups with 11 family members and nine staff members. Thematic analysis identified the themes personalised care for people with dementia, family involvement – continuing to care, and staff competence and confidence to care. A personalised approach to supporting people with dementia was considered paramount, communicative family–staff relationships enhanced the social environment, and competence enhanced confidence and quality care. Participants identified positive ways of working that benefited staff and families and they reported increased well-being for the people with dementia on the unit. Developing well-articulated and systematically implemented local models of care provides opportunities for family and staff creativity and engagement, enhancing care for people with dementia. Strong and effective leadership is required to enable these approaches to become a reality.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32857/

Source: Scopus

An ordinary life: People with dementia living in a residential setting.

Authors: Brannelly, T., Gilmour, J.A., O'Reilly, H., Leighton, M. and Woodford, A.

Journal: Dementia (London)

Volume: 18

Issue: 2

Pages: 757-768

eISSN: 1741-2684

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217693169

Abstract:

The aim of this research was to explore the experiences of care support workers and family members of the impact of a new care approach in a specialised unit as it shifted from a clinical to an inclusive model, focused on creating an ordinary life for people with dementia and their families. The research was a partnership between the unit staff and university researchers. Using a qualitative approach, data were collected in focus groups with 11 family members and nine staff members. Thematic analysis identified the themes personalised care for people with dementia, family involvement - continuing to care, and staff competence and confidence to care. A personalised approach to supporting people with dementia was considered paramount, communicative family-staff relationships enhanced the social environment, and competence enhanced confidence and quality care. Participants identified positive ways of working that benefited staff and families and they reported increased well-being for the people with dementia on the unit. Developing well-articulated and systematically implemented local models of care provides opportunities for family and staff creativity and engagement, enhancing care for people with dementia. Strong and effective leadership is required to enable these approaches to become a reality.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32857/

Source: PubMed

An ordinary life: People with dementia living in a residential setting.

Authors: Brannelly, T., Gilmour, J.A., O'Reilly, H., Leighton, M. and Woodford, A.

Journal: Dementia (London, England)

Volume: 18

Issue: 2

Pages: 757-768

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217693169

Abstract:

The aim of this research was to explore the experiences of care support workers and family members of the impact of a new care approach in a specialised unit as it shifted from a clinical to an inclusive model, focused on creating an ordinary life for people with dementia and their families. The research was a partnership between the unit staff and university researchers. Using a qualitative approach, data were collected in focus groups with 11 family members and nine staff members. Thematic analysis identified the themes personalised care for people with dementia, family involvement - continuing to care, and staff competence and confidence to care. A personalised approach to supporting people with dementia was considered paramount, communicative family-staff relationships enhanced the social environment, and competence enhanced confidence and quality care. Participants identified positive ways of working that benefited staff and families and they reported increased well-being for the people with dementia on the unit. Developing well-articulated and systematically implemented local models of care provides opportunities for family and staff creativity and engagement, enhancing care for people with dementia. Strong and effective leadership is required to enable these approaches to become a reality.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32857/

Source: Europe PubMed Central