Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.A.

Journal: European Journal of Cancer Care

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1365-2354

ISSN: 0961-5423

DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13067

Abstract:

Background: Survivors of haematological malignancies endure long-term effects of both treatment and disease. This paper examines factors that influence their quality of life through reporting on the results of a survey. Methods: Survey using previously validated quality of life questionnaires for use in cancer management. Participants were adults aged 18 and over who had completed treatment for a haematological malignancy and were between 1 and 5 years post-treatment. Findings: A total of 131 participants, median age of 66, completed questionnaires (66% response rate). Significant associations were found between age, global quality of life, physical and role functioning. Men reported better physical functioning and lower symptom scores than women. Employed participants reported better quality of life. Increasing age was associated with lowest quality of life. Best role functioning was also noted in participants who lived beyond 2.5 years following treatment completion. The survey suggested a gender difference with men reporting better physical functioning, fewer symptoms of pain and less loss of sleep compared with women. Conclusion: This study contributes to the underdeveloped area of care for and research into adult haematological cancer survivors. Knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect the quality of life of such adults may provide an insight into implementation measures.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

Source: Scopus

Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy.

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.A.

Journal: Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

Pages: e13067

eISSN: 1365-2354

DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13067

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Survivors of haematological malignancies endure long-term effects of both treatment and disease. This paper examines factors that influence their quality of life through reporting on the results of a survey. METHODS: Survey using previously validated quality of life questionnaires for use in cancer management. Participants were adults aged 18 and over who had completed treatment for a haematological malignancy and were between 1 and 5 years post-treatment. FINDINGS: A total of 131 participants, median age of 66, completed questionnaires (66% response rate). Significant associations were found between age, global quality of life, physical and role functioning. Men reported better physical functioning and lower symptom scores than women. Employed participants reported better quality of life. Increasing age was associated with lowest quality of life. Best role functioning was also noted in participants who lived beyond 2.5 years following treatment completion. The survey suggested a gender difference with men reporting better physical functioning, fewer symptoms of pain and less loss of sleep compared with women. CONCLUSION: This study contributes to the underdeveloped area of care for and research into adult haematological cancer survivors. Knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect the quality of life of such adults may provide an insight into implementation measures.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

Source: PubMed

Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.A.

Journal: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1365-2354

ISSN: 0961-5423

DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13067

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.

Journal: European Journal of Cancer Care

Publisher: Wiley

eISSN: 1365-2354

Abstract:

Background: Survivors of haematological malignancies endure long-term effects of both treatment and disease. This paper examines factors that influence their quality of life through reporting on the results of a survey. Methods: survey using previously validated quality of life questionnaires for use in cancer management. Participants were adults aged 18 and ove who had completed treatment for a haematological malignancy and were between 1-5 years post treatment. Findings: 131 participants, median age of 66, completed questionnaires (66% response rate). Significant associations were found between age, global quality of life, physical and role functioning. Men reported better physical functioning and lower symptom scores then women. Employed participants reported better quality of life. Increasing age was associated with lowest quality of life. Best role functioning was also noted in participants who lived beyond 2.5 years following treatment completion. The survey suggested a gender difference with men reporting better physical functioning, fewer symptoms of pain and less loss of sleep compared to women. Conclusion: this study contributes to the underdeveloped area of care for and research into adult haematological cancer survivors. Knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect the quality of life of such adults may provide an insight into implementation measures.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13652354

Source: Manual

Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy.

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.A.

Journal: European journal of cancer care

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

Pages: e13067

eISSN: 1365-2354

ISSN: 0961-5423

DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13067

Abstract:

Background

Survivors of haematological malignancies endure long-term effects of both treatment and disease. This paper examines factors that influence their quality of life through reporting on the results of a survey.

Methods

Survey using previously validated quality of life questionnaires for use in cancer management. Participants were adults aged 18 and over who had completed treatment for a haematological malignancy and were between 1 and 5 years post-treatment.

Findings

A total of 131 participants, median age of 66, completed questionnaires (66% response rate). Significant associations were found between age, global quality of life, physical and role functioning. Men reported better physical functioning and lower symptom scores than women. Employed participants reported better quality of life. Increasing age was associated with lowest quality of life. Best role functioning was also noted in participants who lived beyond 2.5 years following treatment completion. The survey suggested a gender difference with men reporting better physical functioning, fewer symptoms of pain and less loss of sleep compared with women.

Conclusion

This study contributes to the underdeveloped area of care for and research into adult haematological cancer survivors. Knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect the quality of life of such adults may provide an insight into implementation measures.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Quality of life in survivors of adult haematological malignancy

Authors: Immanuel, A., Hunt, J., McCarthy, H., van Teijlingen, E. and Sheppard, Z.

Journal: European Journal of Cancer Care

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

ISSN: 0961-5423

Abstract:

Background: Survivors of haematological malignancies endure long-term effects of both treatment and disease. This paper examines factors that influence their quality of life through reporting on the results of a survey. Methods: survey using previously validated quality of life questionnaires for use in cancer management. Participants were adults aged 18 and ove who had completed treatment for a haematological malignancy and were between 1-5 years post treatment. Findings: 131 participants, median age of 66, completed questionnaires (66% response rate). Significant associations were found between age, global quality of life, physical and role functioning. Men reported better physical functioning and lower symptom scores then women. Employed participants reported better quality of life. Increasing age was associated with lowest quality of life. Best role functioning was also noted in participants who lived beyond 2.5 years following treatment completion. The survey suggested a gender difference with men reporting better physical functioning, fewer symptoms of pain and less loss of sleep compared to women. Conclusion: this study contributes to the underdeveloped area of care for and research into adult haematological cancer survivors. Knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect the quality of life of such adults may provide an insight into implementation measures.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32115/

Source: BURO EPrints