Cosmopolitan Metapopulations?

Authors: Fenchel, T., Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 170

Issue: 3

Pages: 314-318

eISSN: 1618-0941

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2019.05.002

Abstract:

A “metapopulation” is a group of populations of the same species separated by space but linked by dispersal and migration. Metapopulations of macroscopic organisms tend to have geographically-restricted distributions, but this does not seem to be the case in microbial eukaryotes due to their astronomical abundance. The term “metapopulation” was first applied to protists’ biogeography in the article Finlay and Fenchel (2004), published in PROTIST, which contributed to the popularity of the paper. The article considered protist species as consisting of a single, cosmopolitan population. Here, we recall this paper, and assess developments during the last 15 years with respect to the question of protist species distribution on the surface of the earth.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32276/

Source: Scopus

Cosmopolitan Metapopulations?

Authors: Fenchel, T., Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 170

Issue: 3

Pages: 314-318

eISSN: 1618-0941

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2019.05.002

Abstract:

A "metapopulation" is a group of populations of the same species separated by space but linked by dispersal and migration. Metapopulations of macroscopic organisms tend to have geographically-restricted distributions, but this does not seem to be the case in microbial eukaryotes due to their astronomical abundance. The term "metapopulation" was first applied to protists' biogeography in the article Finlay and Fenchel (2004), published in PROTIST, which contributed to the popularity of the paper. The article considered protist species as consisting of a single, cosmopolitan population. Here, we recall this paper, and assess developments during the last 15 years with respect to the question of protist species distribution on the surface of the earth.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32276/

Source: PubMed

Cosmopolitan Metapopulations?

Authors: Fenchel, T., Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: PROTIST

Volume: 170

Issue: 3

Pages: 314-318

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2019.05.002

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32276/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Cosmopolitan metapopulations?

Authors: Fenchel, T., Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.

Journal: PROTIST

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2019.05.002

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32276/

Source: Manual

Cosmopolitan Metapopulations?

Authors: Fenchel, T., Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 170

Issue: 3

Pages: 314-318

eISSN: 1618-0941

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2019.05.002

Abstract:

A "metapopulation" is a group of populations of the same species separated by space but linked by dispersal and migration. Metapopulations of macroscopic organisms tend to have geographically-restricted distributions, but this does not seem to be the case in microbial eukaryotes due to their astronomical abundance. The term "metapopulation" was first applied to protists' biogeography in the article Finlay and Fenchel (2004), published in PROTIST, which contributed to the popularity of the paper. The article considered protist species as consisting of a single, cosmopolitan population. Here, we recall this paper, and assess developments during the last 15 years with respect to the question of protist species distribution on the surface of the earth.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32276/

Source: Europe PubMed Central