An eye-movement exploration into return-sweep targeting during reading

Authors: Slattery, T. and Vasilev, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32336/

Journal: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics

Publisher: Psychonomic Society Inc.

ISSN: 0031-5117

DOI: 10.3758/s13414-019-01742-3

Return-sweeps are an essential eye-movement that takes the readers’ eyes from the end of one line of text to the start of the next. While return-sweeps are common during normal reading, the eye-movement literature is dominated by single-line reading studies where no return-sweeps are needed. The present experiment was designed to explore what readers are targeting with their return-sweeps. Participants read two short stories by Frank L. Baum while their eye-movements were being recorded. In one story, every line-initial word was highlighted by formatting it in bold, while the other story was presented normally (i.e., without any bolding). The bolding manipulation significantly reduced oculomotor error associated with return-sweeps, as these saccades landed closer to the left margin and were less likely to require corrective saccades compared to the control condition. However, despite this reduction in oculomotor error, the bolding had no influence on local fixation durations or global reading time measures. Moreover, return-sweep landing sites were not impacted by line-initial word length nor did the effect of bolding interact with the length of the line-initial word, suggesting that readers were not targeting the centre of line-initial words. We discuss the implication of these findings for return-sweep targeting and eye-movement control during reading.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Slattery, T.J. and Vasilev, M.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32336/

Journal: Atten Percept Psychophys

Volume: 81

Issue: 5

Pages: 1197-1203

eISSN: 1943-393X

DOI: 10.3758/s13414-019-01742-3

Return-sweeps are an essential eye-movement that takes the readers' eyes from the end of one line of text to the start of the next. While return-sweeps are common during normal reading, the eye-movement literature is dominated by single-line reading studies where no return-sweeps are needed. The present experiment was designed to explore what readers are targeting with their return-sweeps. Participants read two short stories by Frank L. Baum while their eye-movements were being recorded. In one story, every line-initial word was highlighted by formatting it in bold, while the other story was presented normally (i.e., without any bolding). The bolding manipulation significantly reduced oculomotor error associated with return-sweeps, as these saccades landed closer to the left margin and were less likely to require corrective saccades compared to the control condition. However, despite this reduction in oculomotor error, the bolding had no influence on local fixation durations or global reading-time measures. Moreover, return-sweep landing sites were not impacted by line-initial word length nor did the effect of bolding interact with the length of the line-initial word, suggesting that readers were not targeting the centre of line-initial words. We discuss the implication of these findings for return-sweep targeting and eye-movement control during reading.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Slattery, T.J. and Vasilev, M.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32336/

Journal: Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics

Volume: 81

Issue: 5

Pages: 1197-1203

eISSN: 1943-393X

ISSN: 1943-3921

DOI: 10.3758/s13414-019-01742-3

© 2019, The Author(s). Return-sweeps are an essential eye-movement that takes the readers’ eyes from the end of one line of text to the start of the next. While return-sweeps are common during normal reading, the eye-movement literature is dominated by single-line reading studies where no return-sweeps are needed. The present experiment was designed to explore what readers are targeting with their return-sweeps. Participants read two short stories by Frank L. Baum while their eye-movements were being recorded. In one story, every line-initial word was highlighted by formatting it in bold, while the other story was presented normally (i.e., without any bolding). The bolding manipulation significantly reduced oculomotor error associated with return-sweeps, as these saccades landed closer to the left margin and were less likely to require corrective saccades compared to the control condition. However, despite this reduction in oculomotor error, the bolding had no influence on local fixation durations or global reading-time measures. Moreover, return-sweep landing sites were not impacted by line-initial word length nor did the effect of bolding interact with the length of the line-initial word, suggesting that readers were not targeting the centre of line-initial words. We discuss the implication of these findings for return-sweep targeting and eye-movement control during reading.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Slattery, T.J. and Vasilev, M.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32336/

Journal: ATTENTION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS

Volume: 81

Issue: 5

Pages: 1197-1203

eISSN: 1943-393X

ISSN: 1943-3921

DOI: 10.3758/s13414-019-01742-3

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.