On being outdoors: How people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerabilities

Authors: Bartlett, R. and Brannelly, T.

Journal: Social Science and Medicine

Volume: 235

eISSN: 1873-5347

ISSN: 0277-9536

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.041

Abstract:

Vulnerability is a problematic label routinely applied to people with dementia, yet their situated experiences of vulnerability have not been prioritised or documented. Drawing on empirical data collected using a novel methodology - walking interviews with 15 people with dementia living in Southern England, followed by a sit-down interview that included a nominated family member - this paper advances understanding of how vulnerability is experienced and dealt with by people with dementia when outdoors, and at times shared with family carers. Data were analysed using abductive techniques; a thematic coding framework was created from the dataset, in addition to the application of critical theories of vulnerability and disability. We found that vulnerability is characterised by a sense of ‘ontological vulnerability’ for the person diagnosed with the condition - that is, an awareness of failing knowledge about oneself or the ‘rules’ of outdoor life, which individuals experienced emotionally and dealt with civically. People with dementia attempted to manage risks and anxieties, often doing this independently so as not to burden family members. These findings highlight how people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerability when outdoors, which others need to acknowledge and support to enable people with dementia and their families to work though these challenges, in a family-orientated way when risk planning.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32412/

Source: Scopus

On being outdoors: How people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerabilities.

Authors: Bartlett, R. and Brannelly, T.

Journal: Soc Sci Med

Volume: 235

Pages: 112336

eISSN: 1873-5347

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.041

Abstract:

Vulnerability is a problematic label routinely applied to people with dementia, yet their situated experiences of vulnerability have not been prioritised or documented. Drawing on empirical data collected using a novel methodology - walking interviews with 15 people with dementia living in Southern England, followed by a sit-down interview that included a nominated family member - this paper advances understanding of how vulnerability is experienced and dealt with by people with dementia when outdoors, and at times shared with family carers. Data were analysed using abductive techniques; a thematic coding framework was created from the dataset, in addition to the application of critical theories of vulnerability and disability. We found that vulnerability is characterised by a sense of 'ontological vulnerability' for the person diagnosed with the condition - that is, an awareness of failing knowledge about oneself or the 'rules' of outdoor life, which individuals experienced emotionally and dealt with civically. People with dementia attempted to manage risks and anxieties, often doing this independently so as not to burden family members. These findings highlight how people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerability when outdoors, which others need to acknowledge and support to enable people with dementia and their families to work though these challenges, in a family-orientated way when risk planning.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32412/

Source: PubMed

On being outdoors: How people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerabilities

Authors: Bartlett, R. and Brannelly, P.

Journal: Social Science and Medicine

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0277-9536

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.041

Abstract:

Vulnerability is a problematic label routinely applied to people with dementia, yet their situated experiences of vulnerability have not been prioritised or documented. Drawing on empirical data collected using a novel methodology - walking interviews with 15 people with dementia living in Southern England, followed by a sit-down interview that included a nominated family member - this paper advances understanding of how vulnerability is experienced and dealt with by people with dementia when outdoors, and at times shared with family carers. Data were analysed using abductive techniques; a thematic coding framework was created from the dataset, in addition to the application of critical theories of vulnerability and disability. We found that vulnerability is characterised by a sense of ‘ontological vulnerability’ for the person diagnosed with the condition - that is, an awareness of failing knowledge about oneself or the ‘rules’ of outdoor life, which individuals experienced emotionally and dealt with civically. People with dementia attempted to manage risks and anxieties, often doing this independently so as not to burden family members. These findings highlight how people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerability when outdoors, which others need to acknowledge and support to enable people with dementia and their families to work though these challenges, in a family-orientated way when risk planning.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32412/

Source: Manual

On being outdoors: How people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerabilities.

Authors: Bartlett, R. and Brannelly, T.

Journal: Social science & medicine (1982)

Volume: 235

Pages: 112336

eISSN: 1873-5347

ISSN: 0277-9536

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.041

Abstract:

Vulnerability is a problematic label routinely applied to people with dementia, yet their situated experiences of vulnerability have not been prioritised or documented. Drawing on empirical data collected using a novel methodology - walking interviews with 15 people with dementia living in Southern England, followed by a sit-down interview that included a nominated family member - this paper advances understanding of how vulnerability is experienced and dealt with by people with dementia when outdoors, and at times shared with family carers. Data were analysed using abductive techniques; a thematic coding framework was created from the dataset, in addition to the application of critical theories of vulnerability and disability. We found that vulnerability is characterised by a sense of 'ontological vulnerability' for the person diagnosed with the condition - that is, an awareness of failing knowledge about oneself or the 'rules' of outdoor life, which individuals experienced emotionally and dealt with civically. People with dementia attempted to manage risks and anxieties, often doing this independently so as not to burden family members. These findings highlight how people with dementia experience and deal with vulnerability when outdoors, which others need to acknowledge and support to enable people with dementia and their families to work though these challenges, in a family-orientated way when risk planning.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32412/

Source: Europe PubMed Central