GP trainees’ experience, knowledge and attitudes towards caring for refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33050/

Journal: Education for Primary Care

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 1473-9879

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33050/

Journal: Educ Prim Care

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 322-323

eISSN: 1475-990X

DOI: 10.1080/14739879.2019.1652699

Context: According to the World Health Organisation 'more people are on the move now than ever before with an estimated 1 billion migrants in the world today and 68 million forcibly displaced people'. GPs are on the frontline of healthcare in the UK and have a responsibility to provide free and equitable access for everyone. Aim: The main aim of our work was to assess GP trainees' current experience, knowledge and attitudes towards caring for refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants. Description: 30 final year GP trainees on the Dorset Vocational Training Scheme (VTS) were asked to participate by completing a questionnaire. Outcomes: The results show that GP trainees lack knowledge regarding migrants health needs, rights to care, including whether there is a duty to disclose an illegal immigrant and what to do if a patient could not provide proof of identification. They lacked experience and confidence in caring for this group of patients, with the biggest perceived challenge being language barriers. Conclusions: Education in primary care needs to respond to meet the challenge of population movement (5), and this project highlighted a need to improve education on migrants' rights to care, local support groups, as well as common health problems. In response, we have reviewed our curriculum and introduced an education session on refugee health for all our GP trainees in Dorset.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33050/

Journal: Education for Primary Care

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 322-323

eISSN: 1475-990X

ISSN: 1473-9879

DOI: 10.1080/14739879.2019.1652699

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Context: According to the World Health Organisation ‘more people are on the move now than ever before with an estimated 1 billion migrants in the world today and 68 million forcibly displaced people'. GPs are on the frontline of healthcare in the UK and have a responsibility to provide free and equitable access for everyone. Aim: The main aim of our work was to assess GP trainees’ current experience, knowledge and attitudes towards caring for refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants. Description: 30 final year GP trainees on the Dorset Vocational Training Scheme (VTS) were asked to participate by completing a questionnaire. Outcomes: The results show that GP trainees lack knowledge regarding migrants health needs, rights to care, including whether there is a duty to disclose an illegal immigrant and what to do if a patient could not provide proof of identification. They lacked experience and confidence in caring for this group of patients, with the biggest perceived challenge being language barriers. Conclusions: Education in primary care needs to respond to meet the challenge of population movement (5), and this project highlighted a need to improve education on migrants’ rights to care, local support groups, as well as common health problems. In response, we have reviewed our curriculum and introduced an education session on refugee health for all our GP trainees in Dorset.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33050/

Journal: EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 322-323

eISSN: 1475-990X

ISSN: 1473-9879

DOI: 10.1080/14739879.2019.1652699

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.