The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C

Authors: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Brown, S. et al.

Journal: Science

Volume: 365

Issue: 6459

eISSN: 1095-9203

ISSN: 0036-8075

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6974

Abstract:

Increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases have led to a global mean surface temperature 1.0°C higher than during the pre-industrial period. We expand on the recent IPCC Special Report on global warming of 1.5°C and review the additional risks associated with higher levels of warming, each having major implications for multiple geographies, climates, and ecosystems. Limiting warming to 1.5°C rather than 2.0°C would be required to maintain substantial proportions of ecosystems and would have clear benefits for human health and economies. These conclusions are relevant for people everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, where the escalation of climate-related risks may prevent the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32695/

Source: Scopus

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C.

Authors: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Brown, S. et al.

Journal: Science

Volume: 365

Issue: 6459

eISSN: 1095-9203

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6974

Abstract:

Increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases have led to a global mean surface temperature 1.0°C higher than during the pre-industrial period. We expand on the recent IPCC Special Report on global warming of 1.5°C and review the additional risks associated with higher levels of warming, each having major implications for multiple geographies, climates, and ecosystems. Limiting warming to 1.5°C rather than 2.0°C would be required to maintain substantial proportions of ecosystems and would have clear benefits for human health and economies. These conclusions are relevant for people everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, where the escalation of climate-related risks may prevent the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32695/

Source: PubMed

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5 degrees C

Authors: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Brown, S. et al.

Journal: SCIENCE

Volume: 365

Issue: 6459

Pages: 1263-+

eISSN: 1095-9203

ISSN: 0036-8075

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6974

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32695/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C

Authors: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Brown, S. et al.

Journal: Science

Abstract:

Global mean surface temperature is now 1.0°C higher than the pre-industrial period due to increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Significant changes to natural and human (managed) systems have already occurred emphasizing serious near-term risks. Here, we expand on the recent IPCC Special Report on global warming of 1.5°C as well as additional risks associated with dangerous and irreversible states at higher levels of warming, each having major implications for multiple geographies, climates and ecosystems. Limiting warming to 1.5°C rather than 2.0°C is very beneficial, maintaining significant proportions of systems such as Arctic summer sea ice, forests and coral reefs as well as having clear benefits for human health and economies. These conclusions are relevant for people everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, where climate related risks to livelihoods, health, food, water, and economic growth are escalating with major implications for the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32695/

Source: Manual

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C.

Authors: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Brown, S. et al.

Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)

Volume: 365

Issue: 6459

eISSN: 1095-9203

ISSN: 0036-8075

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6974

Abstract:

Increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases have led to a global mean surface temperature 1.0°C higher than during the pre-industrial period. We expand on the recent IPCC Special Report on global warming of 1.5°C and review the additional risks associated with higher levels of warming, each having major implications for multiple geographies, climates, and ecosystems. Limiting warming to 1.5°C rather than 2.0°C would be required to maintain substantial proportions of ecosystems and would have clear benefits for human health and economies. These conclusions are relevant for people everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, where the escalation of climate-related risks may prevent the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32695/

Source: Europe PubMed Central