Nursing considerations for supporting cancer patients with metastatic spinal cord compression: A literature review

Authors: Andrewes, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32835/

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 28

Issue: 17

Pages: S24-S29

Publisher: Mark Allen Publishing Ltd.

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2019.28.17.S24

Background: Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncology emergency. Prevalence is increasing. Treatment and care are complex and those diagnosed may be faced with life-changing challenges. Aims: to review the impact and management of MSCC in patients with cancer, in order to analyse nursing considerations for supporting patients. Methods: a literature review and thematic analysis of five primary research papers, published between 2009 and 2014. Findings: two themes of prognosis/ survival time and independence versus dependence were discovered.

Conclusions: the onset of MSCC may result in paralysis and associated loss of independence, impacting on a patient’s quality of life. Understanding individuals’ prognosis and treatment/care preferences is fundamental for the sensitive, individualised support of patients with MSCC. The findings reinforce the nurses’ role in health education, in order to raise awareness of MSCC and promote early diagnosis so that patients maintain function and independence as along as possible. The findings support the need for nurses to be equipped with appropriate communication skills to initiate and engage in sensitive, difficult and pro-active conversations with patients and their families, supporting the delivery of humanised care.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Troke, R. and Andrewes, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32835/

Journal: Br J Nurs

Volume: 28

Issue: 17

Pages: S24-S29

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2019.28.17.S24

BACKGROUND: metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncology emergency. Prevalence is increasing. Treatment and care are complex and those diagnosed may be faced with life-changing challenges. AIMS: to review the impact and management of MSCC in patients with cancer, in order to analyse nursing considerations for supporting patients. METHODS: a literature review and thematic analysis of five primary research papers, published between 2009 and 2014. FINDINGS: two themes of prognosis/survival time and independence versus dependence were discovered. CONCLUSIONS: the onset of MSCC may result in paralysis and associated loss of independence, impacting on a patient's quality of life. Understanding individuals' prognosis and treatment/care preferences is fundamental for the sensitive, individualised support of patients with MSCC. The findings reinforce the nurses' role in health education, in order to raise awareness of MSCC and promote early diagnosis so that patients maintain function and independence as long as possible. The findings support the need for nurses to be equipped with appropriate communication skills to initiate and engage in sensitive, difficult and proactive conversations with patients and their families, supporting the delivery of humanised care.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Troke, R. and Andrewes, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32835/

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 28

Issue: 17

Pages: S24-S29

eISSN: 2052-2819

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2019.28.17.S24

© 2019 MA Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved. Background: metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncology emergency. Prevalence is increasing. Treatment and care are complex and those diagnosed May be faced with life-changing challenges. Aims: to review the impact and management of MSCC in patients with cancer, in order to analyse nursing considerations for supporting patients. Methods: a literature review and thematic analysis of five primary research papers, published between 2009 and 2014. Findings: two themes of prognosis/survival time and independence versus dependence were discovered. Conclusions: the onset of MSCC May result in paralysis and associated loss of independence, impacting on a patient’s quality of life. Understanding individuals’ prognosis and treatment/care preferences is fundamental for the sensitive, individualised support of patients with MSCC. The findings reinforce the nurses’ role in health education, in order to raise awareness of MSCC and promote early diagnosis so that patients maintain function and independence as long as possible. The findings support the need for nurses to be equipped with appropriate communication skills to initiate and engage in sensitive, difficult and proactive conversations with patients and their families, supporting the delivery of humanised care.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 27, 2020.