Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia

Volume: 20

Issue: 2

Pages: 444-463

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301219887586

Abstract:

Current international dementia care policies focus on creating ‘dementia-friendly’ communities that aim to support the social inclusion of people with dementia. Although it is known that the geo-socio-cultural rural environment can impact on the experiences of people living with dementia, this can be overlooked when exploring and implementing social inclusion policies. This paper addresses an important gap in the literature by exploring the perceptions of daily life for older men (65+ years) living with dementia in three rural areas of England. Open interviews were conducted with 17 rural-dwelling older men with dementia and the data elicited were analysed thematically to construct two higher order themes. The first focussed on ‘Cracking on with life in a rural idyll’ and highlighted the benefits of rural living including the pleasant, natural environment, supportive informal networks and some accessible formal dementia support. The second presented ‘A challenge to the idyll’ and outlined difficulties the men faced including a lack of dementia awareness amongst their family and the wider rural community as well as the physical and internal motivational barriers associated with the rural landscape and their dementia. The findings were interpreted through a lens of social inclusion and demonstrated how the geo-socio-cultural rural environment both enabled and inhibited facets of the men’s experiences of life in their communities. Based on these findings, the paper offers recommendations for practitioners, researchers and policy makers wishing to promote social inclusion in rural-dwelling older men living with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: Scopus

Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion.

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia (London)

Volume: 20

Issue: 2

Pages: 444-463

eISSN: 1741-2684

DOI: 10.1177/1471301219887586

Abstract:

Current international dementia care policies focus on creating 'dementia-friendly' communities that aim to support the social inclusion of people with dementia. Although it is known that the geo-socio-cultural rural environment can impact on the experiences of people living with dementia, this can be overlooked when exploring and implementing social inclusion policies. This paper addresses an important gap in the literature by exploring the perceptions of daily life for older men (65+ years) living with dementia in three rural areas of England. Open interviews were conducted with 17 rural-dwelling older men with dementia and the data elicited were analysed thematically to construct two higher order themes. The first focussed on 'Cracking on with life in a rural idyll' and highlighted the benefits of rural living including the pleasant, natural environment, supportive informal networks and some accessible formal dementia support. The second presented 'A challenge to the idyll' and outlined difficulties the men faced including a lack of dementia awareness amongst their family and the wider rural community as well as the physical and internal motivational barriers associated with the rural landscape and their dementia. The findings were interpreted through a lens of social inclusion and demonstrated how the geo-socio-cultural rural environment both enabled and inhibited facets of the men's experiences of life in their communities. Based on these findings, the paper offers recommendations for practitioners, researchers and policy makers wishing to promote social inclusion in rural-dwelling older men living with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: PubMed

Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: DEMENTIA-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

Volume: 20

Issue: 2

Pages: 444-463

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301219887586

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice

Publisher: SAGE

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301219887586

Abstract:

Current international dementia care policies focus on creating ‘dementiafriendly’ communities that aim to support the social inclusion of people with dementia. Although it is known that the geo-socio-cultural rural environment can impact on the experiences of people living with dementia, this can be overlooked when exploring and implementing social inclusion policies. This paper addresses an important gap in the literature by exploring the perceptions of daily life for older men (65+ years) living with dementia in three rural areas of England. Open interviews were conducted with 17 rural-dwelling older men with dementia and the data elicited were analysed thematically to construct two higher order themes. The first focussed on ‘Cracking on with life in a rural idyll’ and highlighted the benefits of rural living including the pleasant, natural environment, supportive informal networks and some accessible formal dementia support. The second presented ‘A challenge to the idyll’ and outlined difficulties the men faced including a lack of dementia awareness amongst their family and the wider rural community as well as physical and internal motivational barriers associated with the rural landscape and their dementia. The findings were interpreted through a lens of social inclusion and demonstrated how the geo-socio-cultural rural environment both enabled and inhibited facets of the men’s experiences of life in their communities. Based on these findings, the paper offers recommendations for practitioners, researchers and policy makers wishing to promote social inclusion in rural-dwelling older men living with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: Manual

Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion.

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia (London, England)

Volume: 20

Issue: 2

Pages: 444-463

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301219887586

Abstract:

Current international dementia care policies focus on creating 'dementia-friendly' communities that aim to support the social inclusion of people with dementia. Although it is known that the geo-socio-cultural rural environment can impact on the experiences of people living with dementia, this can be overlooked when exploring and implementing social inclusion policies. This paper addresses an important gap in the literature by exploring the perceptions of daily life for older men (65+ years) living with dementia in three rural areas of England. Open interviews were conducted with 17 rural-dwelling older men with dementia and the data elicited were analysed thematically to construct two higher order themes. The first focussed on 'Cracking on with life in a rural idyll' and highlighted the benefits of rural living including the pleasant, natural environment, supportive informal networks and some accessible formal dementia support. The second presented 'A challenge to the idyll' and outlined difficulties the men faced including a lack of dementia awareness amongst their family and the wider rural community as well as the physical and internal motivational barriers associated with the rural landscape and their dementia. The findings were interpreted through a lens of social inclusion and demonstrated how the geo-socio-cultural rural environment both enabled and inhibited facets of the men's experiences of life in their communities. Based on these findings, the paper offers recommendations for practitioners, researchers and policy makers wishing to promote social inclusion in rural-dwelling older men living with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Experiences of rural life among community-dwelling older men with dementia and their implications for social inclusion

Authors: Hicks, B., Innes, A. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice

Volume: 20

Issue: 2

Pages: 444-463

ISSN: 1471-3012

Abstract:

Current international dementia care policies focus on creating ‘dementiafriendly’ communities that aim to support the social inclusion of people with dementia. Although it is known that the geo-socio-cultural rural environment can impact on the experiences of people living with dementia, this can be overlooked when exploring and implementing social inclusion policies. This paper addresses an important gap in the literature by exploring the perceptions of daily life for older men (65+ years) living with dementia in three rural areas of England. Open interviews were conducted with 17 rural-dwelling older men with dementia and the data elicited were analysed thematically to construct two higher order themes. The first focussed on ‘Cracking on with life in a rural idyll’ and highlighted the benefits of rural living including the pleasant, natural environment, supportive informal networks and some accessible formal dementia support. The second presented ‘A challenge to the idyll’ and outlined difficulties the men faced including a lack of dementia awareness amongst their family and the wider rural community as well as physical and internal motivational barriers associated with the rural landscape and their dementia. The findings were interpreted through a lens of social inclusion and demonstrated how the geo-socio-cultural rural environment both enabled and inhibited facets of the men’s experiences of life in their communities. Based on these findings, the paper offers recommendations for practitioners, researchers and policy makers wishing to promote social inclusion in rural-dwelling older men living with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32936/

Source: BURO EPrints