Understanding ‘trafficking vulnerabilities’ among children: the responses linking to child protection issues in Nepal

Authors: Dhakal Adhikari, S. and Turton, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32985/

Journal: Children's Geographies

Volume: 17

Issue: 6

Pages: 1-13

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 1473-3285

The purpose of this paper is to discuss child trafficking in Nepal within the broader framework of child protection. It examines both individual (gender, ethnicity and caste) and structural (their experiences in relation to work, migration, education and lack of birth registration) vulnerabilities and their links with child trafficking as a child protection concern. The paper provides suggestions for why there is a need for a more nuanced understanding of trafficking vulnerabilities as part of a continuum, rather than a distinct event, to improve outcomes for children. We use the evidence presented here to call for a holistic approach. Policies and programmes must be integrated within the broader concerns of child protection, thus strengthening the system from local to national level, while recognising the importance of children’s rights to participate in any decision-making.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dhakal Adhikari, S. and Turton, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32985/

Journal: Children's Geographies

eISSN: 1473-3277

ISSN: 1473-3285

DOI: 10.1080/14733285.2019.1676398

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The purpose of this paper is to discuss child trafficking in Nepal within the broader framework of child protection. It examines both individual (gender, ethnicity and caste) and structural (their experiences in relation to work, migration, education and lack of birth registration) vulnerabilities and their links with child trafficking as a child protection concern. The paper provides suggestions for why there is a need for a more nuanced understanding of trafficking vulnerabilities as part of a continuum, rather than a distinct event, to improve outcomes for children. We use the evidence presented here to call for a holistic approach. Policies and programmes must be integrated within the broader concerns of child protection, thus strengthening the system from local to national level, while recognising the importance of children’s rights to participate in any decision-making.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Adhikari, S.D. and Turton, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32985/

Journal: CHILDRENS GEOGRAPHIES

eISSN: 1473-3277

ISSN: 1473-3285

DOI: 10.1080/14733285.2019.1676398

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 27, 2020.