Future studies, mental health and the question of citizenship

Authors: Morgan, P., Brannelly, T. and Eales, S.

Journal: Mental Health and Social Inclusion

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 23-32

eISSN: 2042-8308

DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2019-0038

Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of utilising future studies to explore citizenship for people with mental health challenges. Design/methodology/approach: This paper critiques the discipline of future studies and considers it in the context of the citizenship and mental health literature. It explores how future studies can be utilised to promote marginalised voices, such as those of people with mental health challenges. Findings: Technology is leading to rapid change in society including what it means to be a citizen (Isin and Nielsen, 2008; Isin and Ruppert, 2015). Whilst citizenship has been promoted within mental health for a long time, change has been slow (Rowe and Davidson, 2016). In order to create inclusive opportunities for people with mental health challenges, any focus on citizenship in mental health needs to not only address the present time but to anticipate and influence future technological directions. Originality/value: This paper is original in bringing together mental health and the future impact on society of new technologies. It stands to offer a new perspective to discussions on citizenship.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33072/

Source: Scopus

Future Studies, Mental Health and the Question of Citizenship

Authors: Morgan, P., Brannelly, P. and Eales, S.

Journal: Mental Health and Social Inclusion

Publisher: Emerald

ISSN: 2042-8316

Abstract:

Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the value of utilising future studies to explore citizenship for people with mental health challenges.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper critiques the discipline of future studies and considers it in the context of the citizenship and mental health literature. It explores how future studies can be utilised to promote marginalised voices, such as those of people with mental health challenges.

Findings: Technology is leading to rapid change in society including what it means to be a citizen (Isin and Nielsen 2008; Isin and Ruppert 2015). Whilst citizenship has been promoted within mental health for a long time, change has been slow (Rowe and Davidson, 2016). In order to create inclusive opportunities for people with mental health challenges, any focus on citizenship in mental health needs to not only address the present time but to anticipate and influence future technological directions.

Originality/value: This paper is original in bringing together mental health and the future impact on society of new technologies. It stands to offer a new perspective to discussions on citizenship.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33072/

Source: Manual