Perceptual integration and the composite face effect

Authors: Liu, C.H., Young, A.W., Basra, G., Ren, N. and Chen, W.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 73

Issue: 7

Pages: 1101-1114

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1177/1747021819899531

Abstract:

The composite face paradigm is widely used to investigate holistic perception of faces. In the paradigm, parts from different faces (usually the top and bottom halves) are recombined. The principal criterion for holistic perception is that responses involving the component parts of composites in which the parts are aligned into a face-like configuration are disrupted compared with the same parts in a misaligned (not face-like) format. This is often taken as evidence that seeing a whole face in the aligned condition interferes with perceiving its separate parts, but the extent to which the effect is perceptually driven remains unclear. We used salient perceptual categories of gender (male or female) and race (Asian or Caucasian appearance) to create composite stimuli from parts of faces that varied orthogonally on these characteristics. In Experiment 1, participants categorised the gender of the parts of aligned composite and misaligned images created from parts with the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) gender and the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) race. In Experiment 2, the same stimuli were used but the task changed to categorising race. In both experiments, there was a strong influence of the task-relevant manipulation on the composite effect, with slower responses to aligned stimuli with incongruent gender in Experiment 1 and incongruent race in Experiment 2. In contrast, the task-irrelevant variable (race in Experiment 1, gender in Experiment 2) did not exert much influence on the composite effect in either experiment. These findings show that although holistic integration of salient visual properties makes a strong contribution to the composite face effect, it clearly also involves targeted processing of an attended visual characteristic.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33232/

Source: Scopus

Perceptual integration and the composite face effect.

Authors: Liu, C.H., Young, A.W., Basra, G., Ren, N. and Chen, W.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 73

Issue: 7

Pages: 1101-1114

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1177/1747021819899531

Abstract:

The composite face paradigm is widely used to investigate holistic perception of faces. In the paradigm, parts from different faces (usually the top and bottom halves) are recombined. The principal criterion for holistic perception is that responses involving the component parts of composites in which the parts are aligned into a face-like configuration are disrupted compared with the same parts in a misaligned (not face-like) format. This is often taken as evidence that seeing a whole face in the aligned condition interferes with perceiving its separate parts, but the extent to which the effect is perceptually driven remains unclear. We used salient perceptual categories of gender (male or female) and race (Asian or Caucasian appearance) to create composite stimuli from parts of faces that varied orthogonally on these characteristics. In Experiment 1, participants categorised the gender of the parts of aligned composite and misaligned images created from parts with the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) gender and the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) race. In Experiment 2, the same stimuli were used but the task changed to categorising race. In both experiments, there was a strong influence of the task-relevant manipulation on the composite effect, with slower responses to aligned stimuli with incongruent gender in Experiment 1 and incongruent race in Experiment 2. In contrast, the task-irrelevant variable (race in Experiment 1, gender in Experiment 2) did not exert much influence on the composite effect in either experiment. These findings show that although holistic integration of salient visual properties makes a strong contribution to the composite face effect, it clearly also involves targeted processing of an attended visual characteristic.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33232/

Source: PubMed

Perceptual integration and the composite face effect

Authors: Liu, C.H., Young, A.W., Basra, G., Ren, N. and Chen, W.

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 73

Issue: 7

Pages: 1101-1114

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1177/1747021819899531

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33232/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Perceptual Integration and the Composite Face Effect.

Authors: Liu, C.H., Young, A., Basra, G., Ren, N. and Chen, W.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Pages: 1747021819899531

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1177/1747021819899531

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33232/

Source: Manual

Perceptual integration and the composite face effect.

Authors: Liu, C.H., Young, A.W., Basra, G., Ren, N. and Chen, W.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 73

Issue: 7

Pages: 1101-1114

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1177/1747021819899531

Abstract:

The composite face paradigm is widely used to investigate holistic perception of faces. In the paradigm, parts from different faces (usually the top and bottom halves) are recombined. The principal criterion for holistic perception is that responses involving the component parts of composites in which the parts are aligned into a face-like configuration are disrupted compared with the same parts in a misaligned (not face-like) format. This is often taken as evidence that seeing a whole face in the aligned condition interferes with perceiving its separate parts, but the extent to which the effect is perceptually driven remains unclear. We used salient perceptual categories of gender (male or female) and race (Asian or Caucasian appearance) to create composite stimuli from parts of faces that varied orthogonally on these characteristics. In Experiment 1, participants categorised the gender of the parts of aligned composite and misaligned images created from parts with the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) gender and the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) race. In Experiment 2, the same stimuli were used but the task changed to categorising race. In both experiments, there was a strong influence of the task-relevant manipulation on the composite effect, with slower responses to aligned stimuli with incongruent gender in Experiment 1 and incongruent race in Experiment 2. In contrast, the task-irrelevant variable (race in Experiment 1, gender in Experiment 2) did not exert much influence on the composite effect in either experiment. These findings show that although holistic integration of salient visual properties makes a strong contribution to the composite face effect, it clearly also involves targeted processing of an attended visual characteristic.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33232/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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