Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination

Authors: Marstaller, L., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Cortex

Volume: 85

Pages: 65-74

eISSN: 1973-8102

ISSN: 0010-9452

DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001

Abstract:

In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34389/

Source: Scopus

Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Cortex

Volume: 85

Pages: 65-74

eISSN: 1973-8102

DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001

Abstract:

In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34389/

Source: PubMed

Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination

Authors: Marstaller, L., Burianova, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: CORTEX

Volume: 85

Pages: 65-74

eISSN: 1973-8102

ISSN: 0010-9452

DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34389/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior

Volume: 85

Pages: 65-74

eISSN: 1973-8102

ISSN: 0010-9452

DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001

Abstract:

In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34389/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Cortex

Volume: 85

Issue: December

Pages: 65-74

ISSN: 0010-9452

Abstract:

In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34389/

Source: BURO EPrints