Factors affecting the uptake of institutional delivery, antenatal and postnatal care in Nawalparasi district, Nepal

Authors: Pradhan, S., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P.P., Dhungel, A., Silwal, R.C., Fanning, P. and Wasti, S.P.

Journal: Kathmandu University Medical Journal

Volume: 17

Issue: 67

Pages: 206-211

ISSN: 1812-2027

Abstract:

Background Maternal deaths and complications are highly preventable with good antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Inadequate information on the factors affecting these services could be barrier to a reduction of maternal deaths in low-income countries. Objective To assess the uptake of antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in eight villages of Nawalparasi district in southern Nepal. A total of 447 women who had given birth within the preceding 24 months were recruited using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to assess association between variables. Result Over 70% of women had gone for at least four antenatal care check-ups while only 14.3% had at least three postnatal check-ups in their last pregnancies. The proportion of institution delivery was 54%. Women’s literacy was associated with the uptake of antenatal services (p=<0.001), postnatal care (p=0.04) and institutional delivery (p=<0.001). Knowledge of antenatal (p=<0.001) and postnatal care was also associated with uptake of respective services (p=<0.001). Conclusion The uptake and knowledge of antenatal care was much better than of postnatal care. Home delivery rates were still very high. A scaling-up of education and awareness-raising interventions in this community could help improve the uptake of maternal health services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33927/

Source: Scopus

Factors Affecting the Uptake of Institutional Delivery, Antenatal and Postnatal Care in Nawalparasi District, Nepal.

Authors: Pradhan, S., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P.P., Dhungel, A., Silwal, R.C., Fanning, P. and Wasti, S.P.

Journal: Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ)

Volume: 17

Issue: 67

Pages: 206-211

eISSN: 1812-2078

Abstract:

Background Maternal deaths and complications are highly preventable with good antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Inadequate information on the factors affecting these services could be barrier to a reduction of maternal deaths in lowincome countries. Objective To assess the uptake of antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in eight villages of Nawalparasi district in southern Nepal. A total of 447 women who had given birth within the preceding 24 months were recruited using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to assess association between variables. Result Over 70% of women had gone for at least four antenatal care check-ups while only 14.3% had at least three postnatal check-ups in their last pregnancies. The proportion of institution delivery was 54%. Women's literacy was associated with the uptake of antenatal services (p=< 0.001), postnatal care (p=0.04) and institutional delivery (p=< 0.001). Knowledge of antenatal (p=< 0.001) and postnatal care was also associated with uptake of respective services (p=< 0.001). Conclusion The uptake and knowledge of antenatal care was much better than of postnatal care. Home delivery rates were still very high. A scaling-up of education and awarenessraising interventions in this community could help improve the uptake of maternal health services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33927/

Source: PubMed

Factors affecting the uptake of institutional delivery, antenatal and postnatal care in Nawalparasi district, Nepal

Authors: Pradhan, S., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P.P., Dhungel, A., Silwal, R.C., Fanning, P. and Wasti, S.P.

Journal: Kathmandu University Medical Journal

Volume: 17

Issue: 67

Pages: 206-211

ISSN: 1812-2027

Abstract:

© 2019, Kathmandu University. All rights reserved. Background Maternal deaths and complications are highly preventable with good antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Inadequate information on the factors affecting these services could be barrier to a reduction of maternal deaths in low-income countries. Objective To assess the uptake of antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in eight villages of Nawalparasi district in southern Nepal. A total of 447 women who had given birth within the preceding 24 months were recruited using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to assess association between variables. Result Over 70% of women had gone for at least four antenatal care check-ups while only 14.3% had at least three postnatal check-ups in their last pregnancies. The proportion of institution delivery was 54%. Women’s literacy was associated with the uptake of antenatal services (p=<0.001), postnatal care (p=0.04) and institutional delivery (p=<0.001). Knowledge of antenatal (p=<0.001) and postnatal care was also associated with uptake of respective services (p=<0.001). Conclusion The uptake and knowledge of antenatal care was much better than of postnatal care. Home delivery rates were still very high. A scaling-up of education and awareness-raising interventions in this community could help improve the uptake of maternal health services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33927/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Edwin van Teijlingen

Factors Affecting the Uptake of Institutional Delivery, Antenatal and Postnatal Care in Nawalparasi District, Nepal.

Authors: Pradhan, S., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P.P., Dhungel, A., Silwal, R.C., Fanning, P. and Wasti, S.P.

Journal: Kathmandu University medical journal (KUMJ)

Volume: 17

Issue: 67

Pages: 206-211

eISSN: 1812-2078

ISSN: 1812-2027

Abstract:

Background Maternal deaths and complications are highly preventable with good antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Inadequate information on the factors affecting these services could be barrier to a reduction of maternal deaths in lowincome countries. Objective To assess the uptake of antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in eight villages of Nawalparasi district in southern Nepal. A total of 447 women who had given birth within the preceding 24 months were recruited using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to assess association between variables. Result Over 70% of women had gone for at least four antenatal care check-ups while only 14.3% had at least three postnatal check-ups in their last pregnancies. The proportion of institution delivery was 54%. Women's literacy was associated with the uptake of antenatal services (p=< 0.001), postnatal care (p=0.04) and institutional delivery (p=< 0.001). Knowledge of antenatal (p=< 0.001) and postnatal care was also associated with uptake of respective services (p=< 0.001). Conclusion The uptake and knowledge of antenatal care was much better than of postnatal care. Home delivery rates were still very high. A scaling-up of education and awarenessraising interventions in this community could help improve the uptake of maternal health services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33927/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Factors affecting the uptake of institutional delivery, antenatal and postnatal care in Nawalparasi district, Nepal

Authors: Pradhan, S., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Dhungel, A., Silwal, R.C., Fanning, P. and Wasti, S.P.

Journal: Kathmandu University Medical Journal

Volume: 17

Issue: 67

Pages: 206-211

ISSN: 1812-2027

Abstract:

© 2019, Kathmandu University. All rights reserved. Background Maternal deaths and complications are highly preventable with good antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Inadequate information on the factors affecting these services could be barrier to a reduction of maternal deaths in low-income countries. Objective To assess the uptake of antenatal, postnatal and skilled care during childbirth. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in eight villages of Nawalparasi district in southern Nepal. A total of 447 women who had given birth within the preceding 24 months were recruited using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to assess association between variables. Result Over 70% of women had gone for at least four antenatal care check-ups while only 14.3% had at least three postnatal check-ups in their last pregnancies. The proportion of institution delivery was 54%. Women’s literacy was associated with the uptake of antenatal services (p=<0.001), postnatal care (p=0.04) and institutional delivery (p=<0.001). Knowledge of antenatal (p=<0.001) and postnatal care was also associated with uptake of respective services (p=<0.001). Conclusion The uptake and knowledge of antenatal care was much better than of postnatal care. Home delivery rates were still very high. A scaling-up of education and awareness-raising interventions in this community could help improve the uptake of maternal health services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33927/

http://kumj.com.np/issue/67/206-211.pdf

Source: BURO EPrints