First Records of ‘Flagship’ Soil Ciliates in North America

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 171

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1618-0941

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2020.125739

Abstract:

‘Flagship’ ciliates were investigated from soil samples collected in Florida, USA. This was undertaken to determine if species thought to be restricted to a given world region could be uncovered from similar habitats in a novel location, e.g. another continent. Two species of Condylostomides were discovered, and recorded from the North American continent for the first time. Condylostomides etoschensis was known only from Africa, but was found to be thriving in a Florida study site. An 18S rDNA sequence for this species was determined for the first time. Also discovered from the same study site was the ciliate Condylostomides coeruleus, previously known only from Central and South America. These two ‘flagship’ ciliates were found in the same habitat, from a continent well outside of their previously recorded biogeographies. Molecular sequencing and microscopy investigations were conducted to form the baseline for future work within this genus. Soil ciliates can obtain large population numbers and form cysts and are therefore likely able to disperse globally. These new records provide additional evidence that large distances, even between continents, do not hinder microbes from thriving globally. The absence of these conspicuously-colored gold and blue ciliates from previous studies is likely due to undersampling, rather than to any physical barriers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: Scopus

First Records of 'Flagship' Soil Ciliates in North America.

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 171

Issue: 3

Pages: 125739

eISSN: 1618-0941

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2020.125739

Abstract:

'Flagship' ciliates were investigated from soil samples collected in Florida, USA. This was undertaken to determine if species thought to be restricted to a given world region could be uncovered from similar habitats in a novel location, e.g. another continent. Two species of Condylostomides were discovered, and recorded from the North American continent for the first time. Condylostomides etoschensis was known only from Africa, but was found to be thriving in a Florida study site. An 18S rDNA sequence for this species was determined for the first time. Also discovered from the same study site was the ciliate Condylostomides coeruleus, previously known only from Central and South America. These two 'flagship' ciliates were found in the same habitat, from a continent well outside of their previously recorded biogeographies. Molecular sequencing and microscopy investigations were conducted to form the baseline for future work within this genus. Soil ciliates can obtain large population numbers and form cysts and are therefore likely able to disperse globally. These new records provide additional evidence that large distances, even between continents, do not hinder microbes from thriving globally. The absence of these conspicuously-colored gold and blue ciliates from previous studies is likely due to undersampling, rather than to any physical barriers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: PubMed

First Records of 'Flagship' Soil Ciliates in North America

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: PROTIST

Volume: 171

Issue: 3

eISSN: 1618-0941

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2020.125739

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

First Records of ‘Flagship’ Soil Ciliates in North America

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Abstract:

‘Flagship’ ciliates were investigated from soil samples collected in Florida, USA. This was undertaken to determine if species thought to be restricted to a given world region could be uncovered from similar habitats in a novel location, e.g. another continent. Two species of Condylostomides were discovered, and recorded from the North American continent for the first time. Condylostomides etoschensis was known only from Africa, but was found to be thriving in a Florida study site. An 18S rDNA sequence for this species was determined for the first time. Also discovered from the same study site was the ciliate Condylostomides coeruleus, previously known only from Central and South America. These two ‘flagship’ ciliates were found in the same habitat, from a continent well outside of their previously recorded biogeographies. Molecular sequencing and microscopy investigations were conducted to form the baseline for future work within this genus. Soil ciliates can obtain large population numbers and form cysts and are therefore likely able to disperse globally. These new records provide additional evidence that large distances, even between continents, do not hinder microbes from thriving globally. The absence of these conspicuously-colored gold and blue ciliates from previous studies is likely due to undersampling, rather than to any physical barriers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: Manual

First Records of 'Flagship' Soil Ciliates in North America.

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 171

Issue: 3

Pages: 125739

eISSN: 1618-0941

ISSN: 1434-4610

DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2020.125739

Abstract:

'Flagship' ciliates were investigated from soil samples collected in Florida, USA. This was undertaken to determine if species thought to be restricted to a given world region could be uncovered from similar habitats in a novel location, e.g. another continent. Two species of Condylostomides were discovered, and recorded from the North American continent for the first time. Condylostomides etoschensis was known only from Africa, but was found to be thriving in a Florida study site. An 18S rDNA sequence for this species was determined for the first time. Also discovered from the same study site was the ciliate Condylostomides coeruleus, previously known only from Central and South America. These two 'flagship' ciliates were found in the same habitat, from a continent well outside of their previously recorded biogeographies. Molecular sequencing and microscopy investigations were conducted to form the baseline for future work within this genus. Soil ciliates can obtain large population numbers and form cysts and are therefore likely able to disperse globally. These new records provide additional evidence that large distances, even between continents, do not hinder microbes from thriving globally. The absence of these conspicuously-colored gold and blue ciliates from previous studies is likely due to undersampling, rather than to any physical barriers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

First Records of ‘Flagship’ Soil Ciliates in North America

Authors: Hines, H.N., McCarthy, P.J. and Esteban, G.

Journal: Protist

Volume: 171

Issue: 3

ISSN: 1434-4610

Abstract:

‘Flagship’ ciliates were investigated from soil samples collected in Florida, USA. This was undertaken to determine if species thought to be restricted to a given world region could be uncovered from similar habitats in a novel location, e.g. another continent. Two species of Condylostomides were discovered, and recorded from the North American continent for the first time. Condylostomides etoschensis was known only from Africa, but was found to be thriving in a Florida study site. An 18S rDNA sequence for this species was determined for the first time. Also discovered from the same study site was the ciliate Condylostomides coeruleus, previously known only from Central and South America. These two ‘flagship’ ciliates were found in the same habitat, from a continent well outside of their previously recorded biogeographies. Molecular sequencing and microscopy investigations were conducted to form the baseline for future work within this genus. Soil ciliates can obtain large population numbers and form cysts and are therefore likely able to disperse globally. These new records provide additional evidence that large distances, even between continents, do not hinder microbes from thriving globally. The absence of these conspicuously-colored gold and blue ciliates from previous studies is likely due to undersampling, rather than to any physical barriers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33983/

Source: BURO EPrints