Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Human Brain Mapping

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

eISSN: 1097-0193

ISSN: 1065-9471

DOI: 10.1002/hbm.25199

Abstract:

The appropriate assessment of threat and safety is important for decision-making but might be altered in old age due to neurobiological changes. The literature on threat and safety processing in older adults is sparse and it is unclear how healthy ageing affects the brain's functional networks associated with affective processing. We measured skin conductance responses as an indicator of sympathetic arousal and used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to compare young and older adults' functional connectivity in the default mode (DMN) and salience networks (SN) during a threat conditioning and extinction task. While our results provided evidence for differential threat processing in both groups, they also showed that functional connectivity within the SN – but not the DMN – was weaker during threat processing in older compared to young adults. This reduction of within-network connectivity was accompanied by an age-related decrease in low frequency spectral power in the SN and a reduction in inter-network connectivity between the SN and DMN during threat and safety processing. Similarly, we found that skin conductance responses were generally lower in older compared to young adults. Our results are the first to demonstrate age-related changes in brain activation during aversive conditioning and suggest that the ability to adaptively filter affective information is reduced in older adults.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: Scopus

Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Hum Brain Mapp

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

eISSN: 1097-0193

DOI: 10.1002/hbm.25199

Abstract:

The appropriate assessment of threat and safety is important for decision-making but might be altered in old age due to neurobiological changes. The literature on threat and safety processing in older adults is sparse and it is unclear how healthy ageing affects the brain's functional networks associated with affective processing. We measured skin conductance responses as an indicator of sympathetic arousal and used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to compare young and older adults' functional connectivity in the default mode (DMN) and salience networks (SN) during a threat conditioning and extinction task. While our results provided evidence for differential threat processing in both groups, they also showed that functional connectivity within the SN - but not the DMN - was weaker during threat processing in older compared to young adults. This reduction of within-network connectivity was accompanied by an age-related decrease in low frequency spectral power in the SN and a reduction in inter-network connectivity between the SN and DMN during threat and safety processing. Similarly, we found that skin conductance responses were generally lower in older compared to young adults. Our results are the first to demonstrate age-related changes in brain activation during aversive conditioning and suggest that the ability to adaptively filter affective information is reduced in older adults.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: PubMed

Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianova, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

eISSN: 1097-0193

ISSN: 1065-9471

DOI: 10.1002/hbm.25199

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Human Brain Mapping

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

eISSN: 1097-0193

ISSN: 1065-9471

DOI: 10.1002/hbm.25199

Abstract:

The appropriate assessment of threat and safety is important for decision-making but might be altered in old age due to neurobiological changes. The literature on threat and safety processing in older adults is sparse and it is unclear how healthy ageing affects the brain's functional networks associated with affective processing. We measured skin conductance responses as an indicator of sympathetic arousal and used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to compare young and older adults' functional connectivity in the default mode (DMN) and salience networks (SN) during a threat conditioning and extinction task. While our results provided evidence for differential threat processing in both groups, they also showed that functional connectivity within the SN – but not the DMN – was weaker during threat processing in older compared to young adults. This reduction of within-network connectivity was accompanied by an age-related decrease in low frequency spectral power in the SN and a reduction in inter-network connectivity between the SN and DMN during threat and safety processing. Similarly, we found that skin conductance responses were generally lower in older compared to young adults. Our results are the first to demonstrate age-related changes in brain activation during aversive conditioning and suggest that the ability to adaptively filter affective information is reduced in older adults.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Hana Burianová

Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Human brain mapping

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

eISSN: 1097-0193

ISSN: 1065-9471

DOI: 10.1002/hbm.25199

Abstract:

The appropriate assessment of threat and safety is important for decision-making but might be altered in old age due to neurobiological changes. The literature on threat and safety processing in older adults is sparse and it is unclear how healthy ageing affects the brain's functional networks associated with affective processing. We measured skin conductance responses as an indicator of sympathetic arousal and used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to compare young and older adults' functional connectivity in the default mode (DMN) and salience networks (SN) during a threat conditioning and extinction task. While our results provided evidence for differential threat processing in both groups, they also showed that functional connectivity within the SN - but not the DMN - was weaker during threat processing in older compared to young adults. This reduction of within-network connectivity was accompanied by an age-related decrease in low frequency spectral power in the SN and a reduction in inter-network connectivity between the SN and DMN during threat and safety processing. Similarly, we found that skin conductance responses were generally lower in older compared to young adults. Our results are the first to demonstrate age-related changes in brain activation during aversive conditioning and suggest that the ability to adaptively filter affective information is reduced in older adults.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Salience and default-mode network connectivity during threat and safety processing in older adults.

Authors: Marstaller, L., Fynes-Clinton, S., Burianová, H. and Reutens, D.C.

Journal: Human Brain Mapping

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 14-23

ISSN: 1065-9471

Abstract:

The appropriate assessment of threat and safety is important for decision-making but might be altered in old age due to neurobiological changes. The literature on threat and safety processing in older adults is sparse and it is unclear how healthy ageing affects the brain's functional networks associated with affective processing. We measured skin conductance responses as an indicator of sympathetic arousal and used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to compare young and older adults' functional connectivity in the default mode (DMN) and salience networks (SN) during a threat conditioning and extinction task. While our results provided evidence for differential threat processing in both groups, they also showed that functional connectivity within the SN - but not the DMN - was weaker during threat processing in older compared to young adults. This reduction of within-network connectivity was accompanied by an age-related decrease in low frequency spectral power in the SN and a reduction in inter-network connectivity between the SN and DMN during threat and safety processing. Similarly, we found that skin conductance responses were generally lower in older compared to young adults. Our results are the first to demonstrate age-related changes in brain activation during aversive conditioning and suggest that the ability to adaptively filter affective information is reduced in older adults.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34568/

Source: BURO EPrints