Interaction design for paediatric emergency VR training

Authors: Matthews, T., Tian, F. and Dolby, T.

Journal: Virtual Reality and Intelligent Hardware

Volume: 2

Issue: 4

Pages: 330-344

eISSN: 2666-1209

ISSN: 2096-5796

DOI: 10.1016/j.vrih.2020.07.006

Abstract:

Background: Virtual reality (VR) in healthcare training has increased adoption and support, but efforts are still required to mitigate usability concerns. Methods: This study conducted a usability study of an in-use emergency medicine VR training application, available on commercially available VR hardware and with a standard interaction design. Nine users without prior VR experience but with relevant medical expertise completed two simulation scenarios for a total of 18 recorded sessions. They completed NASA Task Load Index and System Usability Scale questionnaires after each session, and their performance was recorded for the tracking of user errors. Results and Conclusion: s Our results showed a medium (and potentially optimal) Workload and an above average System Usability Score. There was significant improvement in several factors between users' first and second sessions, notably increased Performance evaluation. User errors with the strongest correlation to usability were not directly tied to interaction design, however, but to a limited 'possibility space'. Suggestions for closing this 'gulf of execution' were presented, including 'voice control' and 'hand-tracking', which are only feasible for this commercial product now with the availability of the Oculus Quest headset. Moreover, wider implications for VR medical training were outlined, and potential next steps towards a standardized design identified.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34629/

Source: Scopus

Interaction design for paediatric emergency VR training

Authors: Matthews, T., Tian, F. and Dolby, T.

Journal: Virtual Reality & Intelligent Hardware

Volume: 2

Issue: 4

Pages: 330

Publisher: Elsevier

DOI: 10.1016/j.vrih.2020.07.006

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34629/

Source: Manual

Interaction design for paediatric emergency VR training

Authors: Matthews, T., Tian, F. and Dolby, T.

Journal: Virtual Reality & Intelligent Hardware

Volume: 2

Issue: 4

Pages: 330-344

ISSN: 2096-5796

Abstract:

Virtual reality (VR) in healthcare training has increased adoption and support, but efforts are still required to mitigate usability concerns. This study conducted a usability study of an in-use emergency medicine VR training application, available on commercially available VR hardware and with a standard interaction design. Nine users without prior VR experience but with relevant medical expertise completed two simulation scenarios for a total of 18 recorded sessions. They completed NASA Task Load Index and System Usability Scale questionnaires after each session, and their performance was recorded for the tracking of user errors. Our results showed a medium (and potentially optimal) Workload and an above average System Usability Score. There was significant improvement in several factors between users’ first and second sessions, notably increased Performance evaluation. User errors with the strongest correlation to usability were not directly tied to interaction design, however, but to a limited ‘possibility space’. Suggestions for closing this ‘gulf of execution’ were presented, including ‘voice control’ and ‘hand-tracking’, which are only feasible for this commercial product now with the availability of the Oculus Quest headset. Moreover, wider implications for VR medical training were outlined, and potential next steps towards a standardized design identified.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34629/

Source: BURO EPrints