A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented timed up and go test in people with mild to moderate dementia

Authors: Williams, J. and Nyman, S.

Journal: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

Volume: 33

Issue: 8

Pages: 2175-2181

eISSN: 1720-8319

ISSN: 1594-0667

DOI: 10.1007/s40520-020-01741-7

Abstract:

Background: Previous research has identified that Tai Chi is effective for reducing risk of falls and improving timed up and go scores. However, our previous research identified no-significant difference in time to complete the timed up and go test following a Tai Chi intervention in people with dementia. Aim: To conduct a secondary analysis to extend our understanding of the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed Up and Go test. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial set in the community. People with dementia, recruited from NHS databases, memory clinics, local charities and self-referral across the south of England, received either 20 weeks of Tai Chi plus normal care or normal care. Outcomes were assessed using the instrumented Timed Up and Go test, completed at baseline and after 6 months. Results: From 83 people with dementia volunteering for the study, 67 complete datasets were available for analysis. Within-group pairwise comparison across time revealed no-significant gains for any of the instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, and no-significant difference for between-group pairwise comparisons. Discussion: This suggests that Tai Chi had no effect on the instrumented Timed Up and Go in people with dementia. This lack of effect may be due to the lack of specificity of the training stimulus to the outcome measure. Conclusion: Tai Chi had no effect on any instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, suggesting Tai Chi may not be best placed to enhance the sub-elements of the instrumented Timed Up and Go to reduce fall risk among community-dwelling people with dementia. Clinical trial registration number: NCT02864056.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: Scopus

A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented timed up and go test in people with mild to moderate dementia.

Authors: Williams, J. and Nyman, S.

Journal: Aging Clin Exp Res

Volume: 33

Issue: 8

Pages: 2175-2181

eISSN: 1720-8319

DOI: 10.1007/s40520-020-01741-7

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Previous research has identified that Tai Chi is effective for reducing risk of falls and improving timed up and go scores. However, our previous research identified no-significant difference in time to complete the timed up and go test following a Tai Chi intervention in people with dementia. AIM: To conduct a secondary analysis to extend our understanding of the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed Up and Go test. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial set in the community. People with dementia, recruited from NHS databases, memory clinics, local charities and self-referral across the south of England, received either 20 weeks of Tai Chi plus normal care or normal care. Outcomes were assessed using the instrumented Timed Up and Go test, completed at baseline and after 6 months. RESULTS: From 83 people with dementia volunteering for the study, 67 complete datasets were available for analysis. Within-group pairwise comparison across time revealed no-significant gains for any of the instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, and no-significant difference for between-group pairwise comparisons. DISCUSSION: This suggests that Tai Chi had no effect on the instrumented Timed Up and Go in people with dementia. This lack of effect may be due to the lack of specificity of the training stimulus to the outcome measure. CONCLUSION: Tai Chi had no effect on any instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, suggesting Tai Chi may not be best placed to enhance the sub-elements of the instrumented Timed Up and Go to reduce fall risk among community-dwelling people with dementia. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02864056.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: PubMed

A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented timed up and go test in people with mild to moderate dementia

Authors: Williams, J. and Nyman, S.

Journal: AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH

Volume: 33

Issue: 8

Pages: 2175-2181

eISSN: 1720-8319

ISSN: 1594-0667

DOI: 10.1007/s40520-020-01741-7

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed Up and Go test in people with mild to moderate dementia

Authors: Williams, J. and Nyman, S.

Journal: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 1594-0667

Abstract:

Background Previous research has identified that Tai Chi is effective for reducing risk of falls and improving Timed-Up and Go scores. However, our previous research identified no-significant difference in time to complete the Timed-Up and Go test following a Tai Chi intervention in people with dementia. Aim To conduct a secondary analysis to extend our understanding of the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed-Up and Go test. Methods Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial set in the community. People with dementia, recruited from NHS databases, memory clinics, local charities and self-referral across the south of England, received either 20 weeks of Tai Chi plus normal care or normal care. Outcomes were assessed using the instrumented timed-up and go test, completed at baseline and after 6 months.

Results From 83 people with dementia volunteering for the study 67 complete datasets were available for analysis. Within group pairwise comparison across time revealed no-significant gains for any of the instrumented Timed-Up and Go variables, and no-significant difference for between group pairwise comparisons. Discussion This suggests Tai Chi had no effect on the instrumented Timed-Up and Go in people with dementia. This lack of effect may be due to the lack of specificity of the training stimulus to the outcome measure. Conclusion Tai Chi had no effect on any instrumented Timed-Up and Go variables, suggesting Tai Chi may not be best placed to enhance the sub-elements of the instrumented Timed-Up and Go to reduce fall risk among community-dwelling people with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: Manual

A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented timed up and go test in people with mild to moderate dementia.

Authors: Williams, J. and Nyman, S.

Journal: Aging clinical and experimental research

Volume: 33

Issue: 8

Pages: 2175-2181

eISSN: 1720-8319

ISSN: 1594-0667

DOI: 10.1007/s40520-020-01741-7

Abstract:

Background

Previous research has identified that Tai Chi is effective for reducing risk of falls and improving timed up and go scores. However, our previous research identified no-significant difference in time to complete the timed up and go test following a Tai Chi intervention in people with dementia.

Aim

To conduct a secondary analysis to extend our understanding of the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed Up and Go test.

Methods

This is a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial set in the community. People with dementia, recruited from NHS databases, memory clinics, local charities and self-referral across the south of England, received either 20 weeks of Tai Chi plus normal care or normal care. Outcomes were assessed using the instrumented Timed Up and Go test, completed at baseline and after 6 months.

Results

From 83 people with dementia volunteering for the study, 67 complete datasets were available for analysis. Within-group pairwise comparison across time revealed no-significant gains for any of the instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, and no-significant difference for between-group pairwise comparisons.

Discussion

This suggests that Tai Chi had no effect on the instrumented Timed Up and Go in people with dementia. This lack of effect may be due to the lack of specificity of the training stimulus to the outcome measure.

Conclusion

Tai Chi had no effect on any instrumented Timed Up and Go variables, suggesting Tai Chi may not be best placed to enhance the sub-elements of the instrumented Timed Up and Go to reduce fall risk among community-dwelling people with dementia.

Clinical trial registration number

NCT02864056.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed Up and Go test in people with mild to moderate dementia

Authors: Williams, J.M. and Nyman, S.

Journal: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

Volume: 33

Pages: 2175-2181

ISSN: 1594-0667

Abstract:

Background Previous research has identified that Tai Chi is effective for reducing risk of falls and improving Timed-Up and Go scores. However, our previous research identified no-significant difference in time to complete the Timed-Up and Go test following a Tai Chi intervention in people with dementia. Aim To conduct a secondary analysis to extend our understanding of the effect of Tai Chi on the instrumented Timed-Up and Go test. Methods Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial set in the community. People with dementia, recruited from NHS databases, memory clinics, local charities and self-referral across the south of England, received either 20 weeks of Tai Chi plus normal care or normal care. Outcomes were assessed using the instrumented timed-up and go test, completed at baseline and after 6 months. Results From 83 people with dementia volunteering for the study 67 complete datasets were available for analysis. Within group pairwise comparison across time revealed no-significant gains for any of the instrumented Timed-Up and Go variables, and no-significant difference for between group pairwise comparisons. Discussion This suggests Tai Chi had no effect on the instrumented Timed-Up and Go in people with dementia. This lack of effect may be due to the lack of specificity of the training stimulus to the outcome measure. Conclusion Tai Chi had no effect on any instrumented Timed-Up and Go variables, suggesting Tai Chi may not be best placed to enhance the sub-elements of the instrumented Timed-Up and Go to reduce fall risk among community-dwelling people with dementia.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34691/

Source: BURO EPrints