Using Walking Interviews to Enhance Research Relations with People with Dementia: Methodological Insights From an Empirical Study Conducted in England

Authors: Brannelly, T. and Bartlett, R.

Journal: Ethics and Social Welfare

Volume: 14

Issue: 4

Pages: 432-442

eISSN: 1749-6543

ISSN: 1749-6535

DOI: 10.1080/17496535.2020.1839115

Abstract:

Ethical research practice requires inclusionary approaches that enable people to contribute as fully as possible. Not enough is yet known about the impacts of dementia on daily life, however, people with dementia may find inclusion in research challenging, as the ‘cognitive load’ required may be overwhelming. When responding is difficult, others may contribute and the voice of people with dementia may be diminished. In this paper, the method of walking interviews is reflected on following a study that examined the acceptability and usefulness of Global Positions Systems (GPS). Attention is drawn to an observation of the contributions people with dementia made whilst out walking with the researchers. When out walking, people with dementia used the environment as sensory prompts to start conversations, and these discussions shaped research data, and enabled people with dementia to raise concerns about the impacts of dementia, their futures and what they feared for themselves and their families. The challenges that people with dementia faced in negotiating everyday practices were visible. The person with dementia showed the researcher around their neighbourhood, and this significantly changed the interview dynamic and positioned people with dementia as leading the interaction.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34777/

Source: Scopus

Using walking interviews to enhance research relations with people with dementia: methodological insights from an empirical study conducted in England.

Authors: Brannelly, P. and Bartlett, R.

Journal: Ethics and Social Welfare

Volume: 14

Issue: 3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 1749-6535

DOI: 10.1080/17496535.2020.1839115

Abstract:

Ethical research practice requires inclusionary approaches that enable people to contribute as fully as possible. Not enough is yet known about the impacts of dementia on daily life, however, people with dementia may find inclusion in research challenging, as the 'cognitive load' required may be overwhelming. When responding is difficult, others may contribute and the voice of people with dementia may be diminished. In this paper, the method of walking interviews is reflected on following a study that examined the acceptability and usefulness of Global Positions Systems (GPS). Attention is drawn to an observation of the contributions people with dementia made whilst out walking with the researchers. When out walking, people with dementia used the environment as sensory prompts to start conversations, and these discussions shaped research data, and enabled people with dementia to raise concerns about the impacts of dementia, their futures and what they feared for themselves and their families. The challenges that people with dementia faced in negotiating everyday practices were visible. The person with dementia showed the researcher around their neighbourhood, and this significantly changed the interview dynamic and positioned people with dementia as leading the interaction.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34777/

Source: Manual