Sentence context modulates the neighborhood frequency effect in Chinese reading: Evidence from eye movements.

Authors: Yao, P., Slattery, T.J. and Li, X.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn

eISSN: 1939-1285

DOI: 10.1037/xlm0001030

Abstract:

In the current study, we conducted 2 eye-tracking reading experiments to explore whether sentence context can influence neighbor effects in word recognition during Chinese reading. Chinese readers read sentences in which the targets' orthographic neighbors were either plausible or implausible with the pretarget context. The results revealed that the neighbor effect was influenced by context: The context in the biased condition (where only targets but not neighbors can fit in the pretarget context) evoked a significantly weaker inhibitory neighbor effect than in the neutral condition (where both targets and neighbors can fit in the pretarget context). These results indicate that contextual information can be used to modulate neighbor effects during online sentence reading in Chinese. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35357/

Source: PubMed

Sentence Context Modulates the Neighborhood Frequency Effect in Chinese Reading: Evidence From Eye Movements

Authors: Yao, P., Slattery, T.J. and Li, X.

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION

eISSN: 1939-1285

ISSN: 0278-7393

DOI: 10.1037/xlm0001030

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35357/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Sentence Context Modulates the Neighborhood Frequency Effect in Chinese Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

Authors: Yao, P., Slattery, T. and Li, X.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35357/

Source: Manual

Sentence context modulates the neighborhood frequency effect in Chinese reading: Evidence from eye movements.

Authors: Yao, P., Slattery, T.J. and Li, X.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition

eISSN: 1939-1285

ISSN: 0278-7393

DOI: 10.1037/xlm0001030

Abstract:

In the current study, we conducted 2 eye-tracking reading experiments to explore whether sentence context can influence neighbor effects in word recognition during Chinese reading. Chinese readers read sentences in which the targets' orthographic neighbors were either plausible or implausible with the pretarget context. The results revealed that the neighbor effect was influenced by context: The context in the biased condition (where only targets but not neighbors can fit in the pretarget context) evoked a significantly weaker inhibitory neighbor effect than in the neutral condition (where both targets and neighbors can fit in the pretarget context). These results indicate that contextual information can be used to modulate neighbor effects during online sentence reading in Chinese. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35357/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Sentence Context Modulates the Neighborhood Frequency Effect in Chinese Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

Authors: Yao, P., Slattery, T. and Liu, X.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

ISSN: 0278-7393

Abstract:

In the current study, we conducted two eye-tracking reading experiments to explore whether sentence context can influence neighbor effects in word recognition during Chinese reading. Chinese readers read sentences in which the targets’ orthographic neighbors were either plausible or implausible with the pre-target context. The results revealed that the neighbor effect was influenced by context: the context in the biased condition (where only targets but not neighbors can fit in the pre-target context) evoked a significantly weaker inhibitory neighbor effect than in the neutral condition (where both targets and neighbors can fit in the pre-target context). These results indicate that contextual information can be used to modulate neighbor effects during on-line sentence reading in Chinese.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35357/

Source: BURO EPrints