Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Volume: 28

Issue: 31

Pages: 41869-41880

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13586-2

Abstract:

Environmental degradation caused by various human activities has been a subject of attention over the globe. There is a concern on how to maintain a clean environment and at the same time achieve optimum production of food and non-food products amidst global energy demand. To this end, this study examines the impact of agricultural development, energy use, and economic growth on CO2 emissions in the emerging seven countries that comprises China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Russia, Indonesia, and Turkey for the annual time frequency from 1990 to 2016. The study uses a battery of econometrics techniques for soundness of analysis the consist of pooled mean group autoregressive distributed lag methodology, dynamic ordinary least squares, and fully modified ordinary least squares as estimation techniques alongside Dumitrescu and Hurlin causality test for the direction of causality analysis. Empirical results revealed that value-added agriculture and economic growth are drivers of CO2 emission in the E7 countries, and the rise in renewable energy causes a reduction in CO2 emissions, while in the short run, economic growth has a positive impact on emissions in the focus countries. Causality analysis shows that there is a feedback causality between economic growth and emissions, between value-added agriculture and energy usage, between emission and value-added agriculture, and between economic growth and agricultural development. Furthermore, energy use does not cause emissions directly; it causes economic growth and value-added agriculture which causes emissions. This position aligns with the advocacy of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN-SDG) Targets 7 and 13 of clean energy access and mitigation of climate changes issues.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

Source: Scopus

Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality.

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int

Volume: 28

Issue: 31

Pages: 41869-41880

eISSN: 1614-7499

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13586-2

Abstract:

Environmental degradation caused by various human activities has been a subject of attention over the globe. There is a concern on how to maintain a clean environment and at the same time achieve optimum production of food and non-food products amidst global energy demand. To this end, this study examines the impact of agricultural development, energy use, and economic growth on CO2 emissions in the emerging seven countries that comprises China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Russia, Indonesia, and Turkey for the annual time frequency from 1990 to 2016. The study uses a battery of econometrics techniques for soundness of analysis the consist of pooled mean group autoregressive distributed lag methodology, dynamic ordinary least squares, and fully modified ordinary least squares as estimation techniques alongside Dumitrescu and Hurlin causality test for the direction of causality analysis. Empirical results revealed that value-added agriculture and economic growth are drivers of CO2 emission in the E7 countries, and the rise in renewable energy causes a reduction in CO2 emissions, while in the short run, economic growth has a positive impact on emissions in the focus countries. Causality analysis shows that there is a feedback causality between economic growth and emissions, between value-added agriculture and energy usage, between emission and value-added agriculture, and between economic growth and agricultural development. Furthermore, energy use does not cause emissions directly; it causes economic growth and value-added agriculture which causes emissions. This position aligns with the advocacy of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN-SDG) Targets 7 and 13 of clean energy access and mitigation of climate changes issues.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

Source: PubMed

Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH

Volume: 28

Issue: 31

Pages: 41869-41880

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13586-2

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Volume: 28

Pages: 41869-41880

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13586-2

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85103422025&doi=10.1007%2fs11356-021-13586-2&partnerID=40&md5=a856fda83cffa0095a215930037b827c

Source: Manual

Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality.

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: Environmental science and pollution research international

Volume: 28

Issue: 31

Pages: 41869-41880

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13586-2

Abstract:

Environmental degradation caused by various human activities has been a subject of attention over the globe. There is a concern on how to maintain a clean environment and at the same time achieve optimum production of food and non-food products amidst global energy demand. To this end, this study examines the impact of agricultural development, energy use, and economic growth on CO2 emissions in the emerging seven countries that comprises China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Russia, Indonesia, and Turkey for the annual time frequency from 1990 to 2016. The study uses a battery of econometrics techniques for soundness of analysis the consist of pooled mean group autoregressive distributed lag methodology, dynamic ordinary least squares, and fully modified ordinary least squares as estimation techniques alongside Dumitrescu and Hurlin causality test for the direction of causality analysis. Empirical results revealed that value-added agriculture and economic growth are drivers of CO2 emission in the E7 countries, and the rise in renewable energy causes a reduction in CO2 emissions, while in the short run, economic growth has a positive impact on emissions in the focus countries. Causality analysis shows that there is a feedback causality between economic growth and emissions, between value-added agriculture and energy usage, between emission and value-added agriculture, and between economic growth and agricultural development. Furthermore, energy use does not cause emissions directly; it causes economic growth and value-added agriculture which causes emissions. This position aligns with the advocacy of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN-SDG) Targets 7 and 13 of clean energy access and mitigation of climate changes issues.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Does agricultural development induce environmental pollution in E7? A myth or reality.

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Bein, M.A., Gyamfi, B.A. and Bekun, F.V.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Volume: 28

Pages: 41869-41880

ISSN: 0944-1344

Abstract:

Environmental degradation caused by various human activities has been a subject of attention over the globe. There is a concern on how to maintain a clean environment and at the same time achieve optimum production of food and non-food products amidst global energy demand. To this end, this study examines the impact of agricultural development, energy use, and economic growth on CO2 emissions in the emerging seven countries that comprises China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Russia, Indonesia, and Turkey for the annual time frequency from 1990 to 2016. The study uses a battery of econometrics techniques for soundness of analysis the consist of pooled mean group autoregressive distributed lag methodology, dynamic ordinary least squares, and fully modified ordinary least squares as estimation techniques alongside Dumitrescu and Hurlin causality test for the direction of causality analysis. Empirical results revealed that value-added agriculture and economic growth are drivers of CO2 emission in the E7 countries, and the rise in renewable energy causes a reduction in CO2 emissions, while in the short run, economic growth has a positive impact on emissions in the focus countries. Causality analysis shows that there is a feedback causality between economic growth and emissions, between value-added agriculture and energy usage, between emission and value-added agriculture, and between economic growth and agricultural development. Furthermore, energy use does not cause emissions directly; it causes economic growth and value-added agriculture which causes emissions. This position aligns with the advocacy of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN-SDG) Targets 7 and 13 of clean energy access and mitigation of climate changes issues.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35363/

Source: BURO EPrints