Patient, Support-Person and Health-Care Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S. and MacLean, C.

Journal: Canadian Journal of Diabetes

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-46

eISSN: 2352-3840

ISSN: 1499-2671

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2021.04.011

Abstract:

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of self-management of feet for patients with diabetes from the perspective of the patient, support person and health-care provider. Methods: The qualitative method, Interpretive Description, was used to guide data collection and analysis. Semistructured interviews were completed with 11 patients, 4 support persons and 9 health-care providers. Results: The overarching theme was that self-management of diabetes and specifically foot health is complex. Six subthemes were identified. Four confirmed what is known in the literature: knowledge of foot self-management, physical ability to provide foot care, footwear and support. The remaining 2 subthemes, readiness to self-manage feet and communication between patients and health-care providers, offered new insights in relation to self-management of foot health. Conclusions: The present findings have major implications for clinical practice, which can be categorized as the 3Rs: rapport, readiness and reinforcement. Rapport with patients and support persons is vital in creating an environment where foot health concerns can be addressed. Readiness to self-manage foot health is an important factor; health-care providers can capitalize on a patient's level of readiness, regularly tailoring foot education to a patient's needs. Reinforcement of positive foot health with patients and support persons is an important strategy for all health-care providers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: Scopus

Patient, Support-Person and Health-Care Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges.

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S. and MacLean, C.

Journal: Can J Diabetes

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-46

eISSN: 2352-3840

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2021.04.011

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of self-management of feet for patients with diabetes from the perspective of the patient, support person and health-care provider. METHODS: The qualitative method, Interpretive Description, was used to guide data collection and analysis. Semistructured interviews were completed with 11 patients, 4 support persons and 9 health-care providers. RESULTS: The overarching theme was that self-management of diabetes and specifically foot health is complex. Six subthemes were identified. Four confirmed what is known in the literature: knowledge of foot self-management, physical ability to provide foot care, footwear and support. The remaining 2 subthemes, readiness to self-manage feet and communication between patients and health-care providers, offered new insights in relation to self-management of foot health. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings have major implications for clinical practice, which can be categorized as the 3Rs: rapport, readiness and reinforcement. Rapport with patients and support persons is vital in creating an environment where foot health concerns can be addressed. Readiness to self-manage foot health is an important factor; health-care providers can capitalize on a patient's level of readiness, regularly tailoring foot education to a patient's needs. Reinforcement of positive foot health with patients and support persons is an important strategy for all health-care providers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: PubMed

Patient, Support-Person and Health-Care Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S. and MacLean, C.

Journal: CANADIAN JOURNAL OF DIABETES

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-46

eISSN: 2352-3840

ISSN: 1499-2671

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2021.04.011

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Patient, Support Person and Healthcare Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S. and Maclean, C.

Journal: Canadian Journal of Diabetes

Publisher: Elsivier

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2021.04.011

Abstract:

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of self-management of feet for patients with diabetes from the perspective of the patient, support person, and health care provider.

Methods: The qualitative method, Interpretive Description, was used to guide data collection and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 11 patients, 4 support persons, and 9 health care providers. Results: The overarching theme was that self-management of diabetes and specifically foot health is complex. Six sub-themes were identified. Four confirmed what is known in the literature: knowledge of foot self-management; physical ability to provide foot care; footwear; and support. The remaining two sub-themes, readiness to self-manage feet and communicating between patients and health care providers, offered new insights related to self-management of foot health. Conclusion: The findings have important implications for clinical practice that can be categorized as the 3Rs: rapport, readiness, and reinforcement. Rapport with patients and support persons is vital in creating an environment where foot health concerns can be addressed. Readiness to self-manage foot health is an important factor; health care providers can capitalize on a patient’s level of readiness, regularly tailoring foot education to a patient’s needs. Reinforcement of positive foot health with patients and support persons is an important strategy for all health care providers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: Manual

Patient, Support-Person and Health-Care Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges.

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S. and MacLean, C.

Journal: Canadian journal of diabetes

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-46

eISSN: 2352-3840

ISSN: 1499-2671

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2021.04.011

Abstract:

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of self-management of feet for patients with diabetes from the perspective of the patient, support person and health-care provider.

Methods

The qualitative method, Interpretive Description, was used to guide data collection and analysis. Semistructured interviews were completed with 11 patients, 4 support persons and 9 health-care providers.

Results

The overarching theme was that self-management of diabetes and specifically foot health is complex. Six subthemes were identified. Four confirmed what is known in the literature: knowledge of foot self-management, physical ability to provide foot care, footwear and support. The remaining 2 subthemes, readiness to self-manage feet and communication between patients and health-care providers, offered new insights in relation to self-management of foot health.

Conclusions

The present findings have major implications for clinical practice, which can be categorized as the 3Rs: rapport, readiness and reinforcement. Rapport with patients and support persons is vital in creating an environment where foot health concerns can be addressed. Readiness to self-manage foot health is an important factor; health-care providers can capitalize on a patient's level of readiness, regularly tailoring foot education to a patient's needs. Reinforcement of positive foot health with patients and support persons is an important strategy for all health-care providers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Patient, Support Person and Healthcare Provider Perspectives on Foot Self-Management for Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Personal Challenges

Authors: Stevens, K., Moralejo, D., Ersser, S.J. and Maclean, C.

Journal: Canadian Journal of Diabetes

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-46

ISSN: 1499-2671

Abstract:

Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of self-management of feet for patients with diabetes from the perspective of the patient, support person, and health care provider. Methods: The qualitative method, Interpretive Description, was used to guide data collection and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 11 patients, 4 support persons, and 9 health care providers. Results: The overarching theme was that self-management of diabetes and specifically foot health is complex. Six sub-themes were identified. Four confirmed what is known in the literature: knowledge of foot self-management; physical ability to provide foot care; footwear; and support. The remaining two sub-themes, readiness to self-manage feet and communicating between patients and health care providers, offered new insights related to self-management of foot health. Conclusion: The findings have important implications for clinical practice that can be categorized as the 3Rs: rapport, readiness, and reinforcement. Rapport with patients and support persons is vital in creating an environment where foot health concerns can be addressed. Readiness to self-manage foot health is an important factor; health care providers can capitalize on a patient’s level of readiness, regularly tailoring foot education to a patient’s needs. Reinforcement of positive foot health with patients and support persons is an important strategy for all health care providers.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35466/

Source: BURO EPrints