A qualitative study exploring women’s experiences of conversations with maternity professionals when home birth is not recommended

Authors: Woodman, J. and Way, S.

Journal: Evidence Based Midwifery

Volume: 18

Issue: 3

Pages: 5-12

ISSN: 1479-4489

Abstract:

ORIGINAL Background: Home birth is a safe option for healthy women with a low-risk pregnancy. Some women who have medical or pregnancy-related risk factors still feel that home birth is the best option for them, based on their own personal circumstances, ethos and perception of risk. When there is a mismatch in these perceptions between the woman and her maternity professionals, conflict can sometimes ensue leading to disempowering conversations, a breakdown in the professional relationship and, occasionally, disengagement from maternity services. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore women’s experiences of conversations with maternity professionals when they are choosing to give birth at home against professional recommendation, in order to identify both positive and negative experiences. Methods: Using narrative inquiry, data were collected from five participants through semi-structured interviews. Women were self-selected via an advertisement on social media aimed at providing peer support to women through pregnancy and birth. The data were analysed thematically using the participants’ own words to name the themes. The analysis was independently verified by the second author to ensure trustworthiness. Ethics: Ethical approval was obtained via a higher education institute ethics committee: ID 20193 on 6 July 2018. Findings: Thematic narrative analysis of the data highlighted five main themes: 1. ‘A battle on my hands’ 2. ‘You haven’t even seen me’ 3. ‘I had done all the research’ 4. ‘It’s making me feel guilty’ 5. ‘But they are not allowed to stop me?’ Discussion and conclusion: The women’s stories demonstrate that making choices that do not align with current recommendations can result in disempowering and disrespectful conversations that undermine women’s trust in maternity services and sometimes their own faith in their ability to give birth. Conversely, respectful and empowering conversations that provide a courteous exchange of unbiased information improve women’s confidence and experience of maternity services.

Source: Scopus

A qualitative study exploring women’s experiences of conversations with maternity professionals when home birth is not recommended

Authors: Woodman, J. and Way, S.

Journal: Evidence Based Midwifery

Volume: 18

Issue: 3

Pages: 5-12

Publisher: T G Scott

ISSN: 1479-4489

Abstract:

ORIGINAL Background: Home birth is a safe option for healthy women with a low-risk pregnancy. Some women who have medical or pregnancy-related risk factors still feel that home birth is the best option for them, based on their own personal circumstances, ethos and perception of risk. When there is a mismatch in these perceptions between the woman and her maternity professionals, conflict can sometimes ensue leading to disempowering conversations, a breakdown in the professional relationship and, occasionally, disengagement from maternity services. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore women’s experiences of conversations with maternity professionals when they are choosing to give birth at home against professional recommendation, in order to identify both positive and negative experiences. Methods: Using narrative inquiry, data were collected from five participants through semi-structured interviews. Women were self-selected via an advertisement on social media aimed at providing peer support to women through pregnancy and birth. The data were analysed thematically using the participants’ own words to name the themes. The analysis was independently verified by the second author to ensure trustworthiness. Ethics: Ethical approval was obtained via a higher education institute ethics committee: ID 20193 on 6 July 2018. Findings: Thematic narrative analysis of the data highlighted five main themes: 1. ‘A battle on my hands’ 2. ‘You haven’t even seen me’ 3. ‘I had done all the research’ 4. ‘It’s making me feel guilty’ 5. ‘But they are not allowed to stop me?’ Discussion and conclusion: The women’s stories demonstrate that making choices that do not align with current recommendations can result in disempowering and disrespectful conversations that undermine women’s trust in maternity services and sometimes their own faith in their ability to give birth. Conversely, respectful and empowering conversations that provide a courteous exchange of unbiased information improve women’s confidence and experience of maternity services.

https://www.rcm.org.uk/media/4217/ent380-midirs-ebm-september2020-electronicversion.pdf

Source: Manual