Refugee, Migrant and Asylum Seekers’ Experience of Accessing and Receiving Primary Healthcare in a UK City of Sanctuary

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

Journal: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 304-307

eISSN: 1557-1920

ISSN: 1557-1912

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01227-2

Abstract:

The World Health Organisation estimate there are about 1 billion migrants in the world today. The scale of population movement and a global refugee crisis presents an enormous challenge for healthcare provision, and too often the specific health needs of refugees and migrants are not met. This study assessed refugee, asylum seeker and vulnerable migrants’ (AMRs') experience of front line primary healthcare in a region of the United Kingdom designated as a ‘City of Sanctuary’. A questionnaire study explored the views of people seeking refuge and third sector workers supporting them. The majority of AMRs were registered with a GP and positive about their consultations. The views of third sector workers provided a less favourable window into their experience of primary care. In conclusion, the work highlighted patchy experience of primary care, even in a region of the UK designated as a ‘City of Sanctuary’ for people seeking refuge. There is a need for further education of rights to care in the UK, information for people on how to navigate local healthcare systems, consistent access to routine health checks and translation services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35674/

Source: Scopus

Refugee, Migrant and Asylum Seekers' Experience of Accessing and Receiving Primary Healthcare in a UK City of Sanctuary.

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

Journal: J Immigr Minor Health

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 304-307

eISSN: 1557-1920

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01227-2

Abstract:

The World Health Organisation estimate there are about 1 billion migrants in the world today. The scale of population movement and a global refugee crisis presents an enormous challenge for healthcare provision, and too often the specific health needs of refugees and migrants are not met. This study assessed refugee, asylum seeker and vulnerable migrants' (AMRs') experience of front line primary healthcare in a region of the United Kingdom designated as a 'City of Sanctuary'. A questionnaire study explored the views of people seeking refuge and third sector workers supporting them. The majority of AMRs were registered with a GP and positive about their consultations. The views of third sector workers provided a less favourable window into their experience of primary care. In conclusion, the work highlighted patchy experience of primary care, even in a region of the UK designated as a 'City of Sanctuary' for people seeking refuge. There is a need for further education of rights to care in the UK, information for people on how to navigate local healthcare systems, consistent access to routine health checks and translation services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35674/

Source: PubMed

Refugee, Migrant and Asylum Seekers' Experience of Accessing and Receiving Primary Healthcare in a UK City of Sanctuary

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 304-307

eISSN: 1557-1920

ISSN: 1557-1912

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01227-2

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35674/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Refugee, Migrant and Asylum Seekers’ Experience of Accessing and Receiving Primary Healthcare in a UK City of Sanctuary

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

Journal: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

Publisher: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers

ISSN: 1096-4045

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01227-2

Abstract:

The World Health Organisation estimate there are about 1 billion migrants in the world today. The scale of population movement and a global refugee crisis presents an enormous challenge for healthcare provision, and too often the specific health needs of refugees and migrants are not met. This study assessed refugee, asylum seeker and vulnerable migrants’ (AMRs') experience of front line primary healthcare in a region of the United Kingdom designated as a ‘City of Sanctuary’. A questionnaire study explored the views of people seeking refuge and third sector workers supporting them. The majority of AMRs were registered with a GP and positive about their consultations. The views of third sector workers provided a less favourable window into their experience of primary care. In conclusion, the work highlighted patchy experience of primary care, even in a region of the UK designated as a ‘City of Sanctuary’ for people seeking refuge. There is a need for further education of rights to care in the UK, information for people on how to navigate local healthcare systems, consistent access to routine health checks and translation services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35674/

Source: Manual

Refugee, Migrant and Asylum Seekers' Experience of Accessing and Receiving Primary Healthcare in a UK City of Sanctuary.

Authors: Scott, R., Forde, E. and Wedderburn, C.

Journal: Journal of immigrant and minority health

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 304-307

eISSN: 1557-1920

ISSN: 1557-1912

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-021-01227-2

Abstract:

The World Health Organisation estimate there are about 1 billion migrants in the world today. The scale of population movement and a global refugee crisis presents an enormous challenge for healthcare provision, and too often the specific health needs of refugees and migrants are not met. This study assessed refugee, asylum seeker and vulnerable migrants' (AMRs') experience of front line primary healthcare in a region of the United Kingdom designated as a 'City of Sanctuary'. A questionnaire study explored the views of people seeking refuge and third sector workers supporting them. The majority of AMRs were registered with a GP and positive about their consultations. The views of third sector workers provided a less favourable window into their experience of primary care. In conclusion, the work highlighted patchy experience of primary care, even in a region of the UK designated as a 'City of Sanctuary' for people seeking refuge. There is a need for further education of rights to care in the UK, information for people on how to navigate local healthcare systems, consistent access to routine health checks and translation services.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35674/

Source: Europe PubMed Central